IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

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DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

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SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

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I know people of every spiritual world who have greater joy than they ever thought possible because God has met them where they are. There is healing and hope for us all.

Many people feel like a vibrant spiritual life is out of reach. They aren’t even sure they want to reach for it.


We hear friends talk about trusting God, having peace with God, even hearing from God. We have relatives whose lives are shaped in positive ways by their faith. Neighbors have confidence that they will live in a better world after this one. But, at least so far, what transforms others hasn’t convinced us.


“Maybe,” we whisper, “God is for other people but just not for me. Perhaps God is like a square peg and I’m a round hole. We just aren’t made for each other.”


Confession time: I used to try to reshape “round hole” people so they could be like me. I’ve stopped that.


I have learned that people are as different on the inside as on the outside. What troubles us, drives us, what gives us healing and hope, even what separates us from God varies from person to person. I have found that a healthy spiritual life begins with understanding our own spiritual shape.  

YOU ARE NOT A ROUND HOLE; GOD IS NOT A SQUARE PEG

DR DAVID DURST

David Durst is the lead pastor at New Life Community in Lexington, Kentucky, instructor at Indiana Wesleyan University, and author of Finding God in Your World and Could God Be for Me? Finding God in Your World can be found at: DavidMDurst.com, 5worlds.org, or your favorite book sellers. The author can be contacted at 5worldwitness@gmail.com.

more articles by dr david durst

Here’s a quick intro to what I call the five spiritual worlds:


The Foreigner feels isolated and marginalized. Intimacy with God and people is both desperately wanted and difficult to achieve. It often becomes less painful to give up on relationships and travel alone.


Fighters are gripped by injustice and are compelled to help people and fix things. But there are always more problems than resources and the desire to make things right becomes tainted with frustration over society’s indifference.


The Faint feel like they are unseen. They have something to offer, but wonder if they can ever be whole unless and until they do something significant.


Fugitives have a clear sense of right and wrong and want to live right. When they fail, they feel guilty and hope to be forgiven and to make amends.


I call the fifth the world of the Flattened, because these people feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. They are not only aware of their own problems, but carry concern for the serious challenges and pain of others.