HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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so movement is good. It can be just doing household chores or chair exercises, things to accommodate those who may have physical restrictions. We recommend what the American Diabetes Association says: working up to 115 minutes a week of quality exercise.”


People with diabetes also have to be careful of their diet.


“For people with diabetes, the focus is on the carb family,” Stanley said. “For some people, we may suggest caloric restrictions. This depends on the person, with the ultimate goal being to get the right balance.”


Stanley recommends using the USDA meal plan, which is available online, as a good way to develop a diet strategy. Portion control is another key for achieving success.


“There are many methods for reducing food intake and developing portion control,” Stanley said. “Use smaller plates and counting while you’re chewing. Most people don’t realize satiety comes from chewing foods.”


The diabetes education program at Baptist Hospital is one of the finest in the country. To find out more, visit the CB Diabetes Education Facebook page or call (859) 260-5122.

Diabetes is an elusive illness. Whether you have Type 1 or Type 2 (adult onset) diabetes doesn’t matter: Both can kill. Proper education becomes imperative for success in dealing with this silent killer. If the body is unable to produce insulin, elevated glucose levels in the blood can mean drastic life changes, and sometimes even a shortened life.


Kathleen Stanley, a certified diabetes educator and registered dietician with Baptist Health Lexington’s Diabetes Education Program, has been teaching the public about diabetes for the past 25 years at several locations in Lexington and Louisville.


“The No .1 issue is that people don’t know the programs exist,” she said. “They may have a diabetes diagnosis, but they don’t know to seek out a program run by someone who knows what they’re talking about.”


Stanley, who is part of a program with 15 educators, knows awareness of the problem of diabetes and receiving proper education is vital.


“It’s not something you can put on a shelf,” she said. “You have to be informed about the consequences of decisions made. There are some things you can’t change: lifestyle factors, rates of obesity, lack of physical activity. But we’ve done a better job of detecting diabetes these days.”

WORKING WITH A DIABETES EDUCATOR

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by charles sebastian

Still the problem remains: Many people don’t even know these diabetes education programs exist.


“We hope people are good advocates for themselves,” Stanley said. “If they’re struggling, they [can] just ask their provider, ‘Is there some place I can go for diabetes education?’ It’s individualized to the person, not just rubber-stamped or off the Web.”


Stanley says many things have changed over the years regarding diabetes.


“When I started over 25 years ago, I was seeing a lot of senior citizens,” she said. “Now, we see people in their 30’s. Type II [patients are] younger than [they were] before, though it can occur at any age.”


Stanley has advice for people who are in danger of developing diabetes.


“The average person, if they cut 500 calories a day, they can see major changes,” she said. “For most people, it’s been a long time since they’ve exercised, so