EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

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It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

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DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

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so movement is good. It can be just doing household chores or chair exercises, things to accommodate those who may have physical restrictions. We recommend what the American Diabetes Association says: working up to 115 minutes a week of quality exercise.”


People with diabetes also have to be careful of their diet.


“For people with diabetes, the focus is on the carb family,” Stanley said. “For some people, we may suggest caloric restrictions. This depends on the person, with the ultimate goal being to get the right balance.”


Stanley recommends using the USDA meal plan, which is available online, as a good way to develop a diet strategy. Portion control is another key for achieving success.


“There are many methods for reducing food intake and developing portion control,” Stanley said. “Use smaller plates and counting while you’re chewing. Most people don’t realize satiety comes from chewing foods.”


The diabetes education program at Baptist Hospital is one of the finest in the country. To find out more, visit the CB Diabetes Education Facebook page or call (859) 260-5122.

Diabetes is an elusive illness. Whether you have Type 1 or Type 2 (adult onset) diabetes doesn’t matter: Both can kill. Proper education becomes imperative for success in dealing with this silent killer. If the body is unable to produce insulin, elevated glucose levels in the blood can mean drastic life changes, and sometimes even a shortened life.


Kathleen Stanley, a certified diabetes educator and registered dietician with Baptist Health Lexington’s Diabetes Education Program, has been teaching the public about diabetes for the past 25 years at several locations in Lexington and Louisville.


“The No .1 issue is that people don’t know the programs exist,” she said. “They may have a diabetes diagnosis, but they don’t know to seek out a program run by someone who knows what they’re talking about.”


Stanley, who is part of a program with 15 educators, knows awareness of the problem of diabetes and receiving proper education is vital.


“It’s not something you can put on a shelf,” she said. “You have to be informed about the consequences of decisions made. There are some things you can’t change: lifestyle factors, rates of obesity, lack of physical activity. But we’ve done a better job of detecting diabetes these days.”

WORKING WITH A DIABETES EDUCATOR

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by charles sebastian

Still the problem remains: Many people don’t even know these diabetes education programs exist.


“We hope people are good advocates for themselves,” Stanley said. “If they’re struggling, they [can] just ask their provider, ‘Is there some place I can go for diabetes education?’ It’s individualized to the person, not just rubber-stamped or off the Web.”


Stanley says many things have changed over the years regarding diabetes.


“When I started over 25 years ago, I was seeing a lot of senior citizens,” she said. “Now, we see people in their 30’s. Type II [patients are] younger than [they were] before, though it can occur at any age.”


Stanley has advice for people who are in danger of developing diabetes.


“The average person, if they cut 500 calories a day, they can see major changes,” she said. “For most people, it’s been a long time since they’ve exercised, so