WHAT IS A SPORTS MEDICINE DOCTOR?

If you or your child sustain an injury during exercise, sports participation, or any type of physical activity, you may be advised to see a sports medicine trained doctor for treatment. A sports medicine trained doctor has specialized training in both the treatment and prevention of sports-related injuries and is also knowledgeable about preventing injury in active people. These specialized doctors are board certified and have extensive additional training through residencies and fellowships.

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WOMEN'S HEALTH AND FITNESS

While many women strive for the finish line with nutrition and exercise, there is another competitor: good posture. As the fashion industry seeks to improve our appearance with sportswear, the battle exists between what looks good and what is truly reinforcing our hard efforts to sustain good posture.   Research shows we spend upwards of 5,000 repetitions of forward bending a day. Whether we are bending over to brush our teeth, tie our shoes or do the infamous leaning over a cellphone or….

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JOINT REPLACEMENT AND YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Joint replacement is indicated for patients who are experiencing intolerable pain and problems with daily functioning. In other words, they have end-stage arthritis. The X-rays of this type of arthritis usually show “bone on bone.” We all want to maximize our health and well-being, so common questions from these patients include, “When should I have joint replacement?” and “What will happen if I wait?”

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WOMEN'S HEALTH AND FITNESS

rotator cuff tears with and without symptoms,” a 65.8 percent prevalence was found in people with kyphoticlordotic posture.


When shopping for a sports bra, I recommend those with wide straps that cross over the top of the shoulder and the shoulder blade, also known as the scapula. This ensures even distribution of support throughout the upper back as opposed to thin straps that apply more pressure. I often encourage my patients to try on different brands and find the one that best fits them.

The first step in preventing and correcting this condition is regular exercise that incorporates muscle balance throughout the day, not just at the gym or in an exercise routine. Because our bodies respond to stress over time, we need to counterbalance the negative stresses placed on our necks and backs with positive stresses. Performing these exercises four to five times a day can help prevent an adverse reaction to a prolonged forward flexed posture.


In addition, the nervous system is put under a lot of tension with a forward head posture. The nervous system is a closed system. What happens at one end of the nerve affects the other end and vice versa. Here at Bluegrass Orthopaedics, we have partnered with the University of Kentucky physical therapy program in conducting a study to determine the effectiveness of postural muscle balance exercises with patients with diffuse wrist pain where there is no pathology in the wrist. The goal is to attain more evidence to support the idea that postural correction, along with appropriate muscle balance, keeps the musculoskeletal and nervous systems healthy.


As we celebrate women this month, I highly encourage a visit to your local sportswear store to find a new and improved sports bra that supports your posture while also engaging in a regular exercise program that promotes good muscle balance. If you are interested in a postural screening, please feel free to contact us at (859) 263-5140 to schedule your appointment.

MIKKI MCCALLUM, PT, DPT, OCS

My name is Mikki McCallum and I have been in physical therapy for 26 years. I worked in outpatient orthopaedics in Pennsylvania for 15 years. I joined Bluegrass Orthopaedics in 2017 and I focus on upper quarter muscle and nerve imbalance with ambitions to research and publish interventions. Outside of work I enjoy running, boating and paddle boarding with my family.

more articles by mikki mccallum

While many women strive for the finish line with nutrition and exercise, there is another competitor: good posture. As the fashion industry seeks to improve our appearance with sportswear, the battle exists between what looks good and what is truly reinforcing our hard efforts to sustain good posture.


Research shows we spend upwards of 5,000 repetitions of forward bending a day. Whether we are bending over to brush our teeth, tie our shoes or do the infamous leaning over a cellphone or laptop, our nervous system as well as the musculoskeletal system are responding to these daily stresses. Just as a pair of shoes shows wear after many miles, so does our posture. We women rely on sports bras to support our upper body through many types of workouts. The question I raise is, “Are they really supportive?” With so many choices on the market, how does one know the right fit? With so many options, from razorback to front and back closures, women are left with too many choices.


Let’s start with muscle balance. Anatomically speaking, there are two pectoralis muscles, pectoralis major and minor, that support the anterior chest wall. There are more muscle layers in the back to support the upper body. The key muscles I see in the clinic that affect posture are the pec minor in the front and the middle and lower trapezius in the back. Not only does poor posture affect your workout, it increases your risk for injury. In an article published in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery in 2015, titled “The impact of faulty posture on

Figure 1 also demonstrates the weight of the head on the spine. The further forward your head is down, the heavier the load the spine must carry. Unfortunately, the longer your head stays forward, the more your thoracic spine, or the upper back, follows. This in turn causes shortening of the pectoralis muscles and lengthening of the back muscles.