BATTLING BALDNESS

Some men look in the mirror and regard a receding hairline with distress, wondering if there is a cure for baldness. Currently, the only truly effective medically proven way to arrest hair loss is to lower dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels. DHT is a form of testosterone that regulates beard growth and hair loss. Higher levels of DHT produce fuller beards at the cost of male pattern baldness. Lower levels of DHT ensure a full head of hair at the cost of the inability to grow a beard.

….FULL ARTICLE

HACKING THE HUMAN BRAIN

Many people enjoy visiting various Web sites and apps that challenge the brain by luring them deeper and deeper into cyber space. Cyber addiction comes in several forms, but all impact the brain. The past two decades have acquainted many people with the concept of hacking. It is why people strive to protect their computers and smartphones from outside sources trying to break in to steal information, implant malware and preocupy their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

HEART ATTACK AND MEN

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than one in three adult men has heart disease. Men around the age of 55 years are more likely than women to experience a heart attack.  Men often ignore the symptoms of a heart attack because they are uncertain about what they are feeling and don’t want to be embarrassed by a simple diagnosis, such as heartburn. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50 percent of men who die from coronary heart disease....

….FULL ARTICLE

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The viruses and bacteria that cause pneumonia are contagious and are usually found in the fluid that secretes from the mouth or nose of someone who is infected. That person can spread the illness by coughing or sneezing. Sharing drinking glasses and eating utensils and touching the used tissues or handkerchiefs of an infected person also can spread pneumonia.


Children usually get routine immunizations against H. influenza and whooping cough beginning at 2 months of age. Vaccines are now also given to fight against pneumococcus, a common cause of bacterial pneumonia. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all children starting at 2 months of age receive this immunization (called pneumococcal conjugate or PCV13). A series of doses needs to be given at two, four, six and 12 to 15 months of age at the same time children receive other childhood vaccines. The flu vaccine is recommended for all children ages 6 months to 19 years old, especially for those with chronic illnesses such as heart or lung disorders or asthma. Those with HIV infection might receive antibiotics to prevent pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii.


It is best to keep children away from anyone with symptoms of a respiratory infection (stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, cough, etc.). A child usually takes a few weeks to recover fully from pneumonia. The cough may last one to two weeks or longer. Though most children recover fully from pneumonia, a few may need specialized treatment for complications.

Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs. Usually it follows an upper respiratory tract infection, with symptoms starting after two or three days of having a cold or a sore throat. It then moves to the lungs. Fluid, white blood cells and debris start to gather in the air spaces of the lungs and block the smooth passage of air, making it harder for the lungs to work well.


Since most forms of pneumonia are linked to viral or bacterial infections that spread from person to person, it is most common during the fall, winter and early spring, when people spend more time indoors in close contact with others.


Pneumonia claims the life of a child every 20 seconds. A child’s risk of catching pneumonia increases due to premature birth, poor nutrition, lack of immunizations, breathing secondhand smoke, asthma, certain genetic disorders, heart defects, a weak immune system and spending time in a crowded place.


Newborns and infants may not show typical signs of pneumonia infection. Their symptoms may include vomiting, paleness, crying more than usual and being limp, lethargic, irritable or restless. Pneumonia caused by certain bacteria, including Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (known as atypical or walking pneumonia) usually results in milder symptoms and is prevalent among school-age children. Children

WHEN CHILDREN HAVE PNEUMONIA

with walking pneumonia may not feel sick enough to stay home, though they could have symptoms such as tiredness, headache, dry cough and a low- grade fever.


Viruses cause most pneumonia cases in preschoolers who are between the ages of 4 months and 5 years. The symptoms they display are usually a cough, sore throat, low- grade fever, diarrhea, nasal congestion, loss of appetite and tiredness or lack of energy.


Bacterial pneumonia is common among school-age children and teens and develops more abruptly than a cold or virus. Symptoms include a high fever, a cough that produces yellow or green mucus, flushed skin, wheezing, sweating or chills, difficulty breathing and a bluish tint to the lips or nail beds.


Children who have been recently hospitalized or have asthma or chronic illness, use antibiotic frequently or have not been fully vaccinated against certain illnesses such as chicken pox, rubella, whooping cough, Haemophilus influenzae type B or seasonal flu are at a greater risk of developing pneumonia. The only sure way to know if a child has pneumonia is to see a doctor.

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

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