BATTLING BALDNESS

Some men look in the mirror and regard a receding hairline with distress, wondering if there is a cure for baldness. Currently, the only truly effective medically proven way to arrest hair loss is to lower dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels. DHT is a form of testosterone that regulates beard growth and hair loss. Higher levels of DHT produce fuller beards at the cost of male pattern baldness. Lower levels of DHT ensure a full head of hair at the cost of the inability to grow a beard.

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HACKING THE HUMAN BRAIN

Many people enjoy visiting various Web sites and apps that challenge the brain by luring them deeper and deeper into cyber space. Cyber addiction comes in several forms, but all impact the brain. The past two decades have acquainted many people with the concept of hacking. It is why people strive to protect their computers and smartphones from outside sources trying to break in to steal information, implant malware and preocupy their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

HEART ATTACK AND MEN

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than one in three adult men has heart disease. Men around the age of 55 years are more likely than women to experience a heart attack.  Men often ignore the symptoms of a heart attack because they are uncertain about what they are feeling and don’t want to be embarrassed by a simple diagnosis, such as heartburn. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50 percent of men who die from coronary heart disease....

….FULL ARTICLE

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Women who have never had diabetes but who have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Hormones from the placenta help the baby develop, but these hormones also block the action of the mother’s insulin. This is called insulin resistance. It makes it hard for the mother’s body to use insulin. She may need nearly three times as much insulin than before. Gestational diabetes starts when the body is not able to make and use all the insulin it needs for pregnancy. Without enough insulin, glucose cannot leave the blood and be changed into energy.


According to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of gestational diabetes is as high as 9.2 percent. Blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery, but if you have had gestational diabetes, you’re at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes later.


Gestational diabetes may increase your chances of having high blood pressure and too much protein in the urine, a condition called preeclampsia. You may require a Caesarean (C-section) to deliver your baby because it may be large. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy, sometimes as early as the 20th week. It does not cause the kinds of birth defects sometimes seen in babies whose mothers had diabetes before pregnancy. However, untreated

WHAT IS GESTATIONAL DIABETES?

gestational diabetes can harm your baby. The baby may grow larger than usual, leading to difficulty during delivery, or there is the possibility of giving birth prematurely. You could have polyhydramnios or too much amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds the baby) in the womb, which can cause premature labor or problems at delivery.


Any woman can develop gestational diabetes, but you are at increased risk if you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, your body mass index (BMI) is about 30, you previously had a baby who weighed 9 pounds or more at birth and one of your parents or siblings has diabetes.


Pregnant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating a balanced, healthy diet based on whole grains, lean proteins, vegetables and other foods that release sugar slowly; exercising; and, if necessary, taking medication. About 15 percent of women with gestational diabetes need to take anti-hyperglycemic medication to balance their blood sugar. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy.

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh