SAFE CAMPING

Some people love the great outdoors and are willing to pitch a tent in the nearest glade and set up a rustic campsite. Other people prefer to camp with all the comforts of home in an RV or trailer. (This is often called “glamping.”) Whatever your preference, being prepared is essential for a safe and successful camping trip.  “Being prepared for emergency situations is critical when people are out in remote areas with limited access to phone service, hospitals and emergency help,” said Don Lauritzen.

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LET YOUR KIDS STOP AND SMELL THE ROSES AT THE ARBORETUM

Are you looking for something that can provide your children a very special opportunity? Something that at the same time will allow them to experience stimulating sensations? The place you seek is right here in Lexington on the campus of the University of Kentucky. The Arboretum is Kentucky’s state botanical garden and includes the Home Demonstration Garden, the Rose Garden and the Fragrance Garden.  Start your exploration with a stop at the Dorotha Smith Oatts Visitor Center, which is open Monday through Friday....

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KEEPING KIDS ACTIVE IN THE SUMMER

Kids these days are heading down the path leading to a sedentary lifestyle, and that makes it important for adults to spark a passion for activity in them. This will keep their bodies, brains and development on track. Summer is the right time to get them moving.

Here are five ways to encourage your kids to live and love an active and healthier lifestyle outdoors.

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•  Turkey wrap with veggies (you can add carbs as required)

•  Oatmeal with whey protein mixed in (good for those with a sensitive stomach)

•  6 ounces of grilled chicken with yam and asparagus

•  Two egg whites, two whole eggs, onions, peppers, low-fat cheese and grapefruit or oatmeal


Oats are full of fiber, which means they slowly release carbs into your bloodstream. They also contain B vitamins, which help convert carbs into energy. Eat one cup of oatmeal at least 30 minutes before you start exercising.


Bananas are great, too, because they are loaded with digestible carbs and packed with potassium, which helps muscle function. Starting your day eating a banana with half a cup of Greek yogurt and then hitting the gym after 30 minutes takes care of your body’s need for protein and carbs.


Smoothies make a wholesome snack. Use a favorite sliced fruit, a cup of Greek yogurt and some granola for a thicker consistency.

Your body builds muscles and recovers all through the day, not just at the gym. So eating well-timed food and snacks can give the body fuel it needs to burn fat, build muscle and recover as best it can. If your workout will last longer than an hour and you prefer eating before a workout, it is best to grab a snack about 45 to 60 minutes in advance and keep it small.


Usually, your pre-workout meal should consist of protein, dietary fat and carbohydrates. For protein, a moderate amount of meat or dairy can work because they contain branched chain amino acids (BCAA), which help decrease protein breakdown during and after your workout and increase the rate of protein synthesis. Fat takes the longest time to digest, so the pre-workout meal should be low in fat. Stay away from oils and fatty meats. Low glycemic carbohydrates can fill up the glycogen stores to help you power through your workout and create an anabolic effect.


Some people can eat a full meal an hour before a workout, while others prefer to eat three to four hours before. You need to experiment with the timings to suit your needs. For a 180-pound man, a meal of around 500 calories eaten two to three hours before a workout should suffice.


For muscle building, a pre-workout protein shake combined with a larger pre-workout meal can help. For overall performance for an intense athletic event, add more carbs. Here are some options:

WHAT TO EAT BEFORE A WORKOUT

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh

Chickpeas with a dash of lemon juice will give you enough protein, carbs and fiber – just quarter cup is sufficient. Other healthy options include dried fruit, egg whites and whole grain toast.


If you can’t find time for a meal or snack, a sports drink with 5 grams of BCAA can help boost energy levels and protect against muscle breakdown.


Be sure to drink plenty of water – at least 16 or more ounces – before, during and after your workout.