HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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WHAT MEN NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DUPUYTREN’S CONTRACTURE


Some people withdraw from social activities because they have trouble playing cards, shaking hands, turning doorknobs and fastening coats and other clothing.


Treatment for Dupuytren’s contracture depends on the severity of the condition. As it progresses, your physician may suggest nonsurgical or surgical treatment with the goal of reducing the symptoms and disability caused by the condition. At present, there is no treatment to stop Dupuytren’s contracture from getting worse. A simple wait-and-see approach may be all that is necessary if the condition remains mild and does not affect activities of daily life.


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DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller

Men, are you aware of Dupuytren’s contracture? This condition occurs when fibrous tissue under the palm thickens and forms a rope-like cord, causing one or more fingers to stiffen, bend and lose flexibility. Over time, the progressively tightening cord can pull the fingers toward the palm, preventing them from straightening. The condition, which can be mistaken for arthritis, can limit hand function over time. It is influenced by age, gender, geography and ethnicity. Men are more likely to have Dupuytren’s contracture than women at a ratio of 9:1. It can progress quickly or develop slowly over a period of years.


This condition is more commonly found in men from Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia, Australia and North America. It is less common in men from Southern Europe and South America and rare in Africa and China. Men with an alcohol addiction, smokers, men with hypercholesterol and diabetes and patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus have a higher risk of developing it.


Dupuytren’s contracture can make performing everyday activities a challenge because as the contracture progresses, range of motion decreases. After a while, even signing your name can become difficult. Many people with Dupuytren’s contracture have been forced to give up some of their hobbies, such as playing the piano, and typing on a keyboard or using certain tools. Psychologically, people with Dupuytren’s contracture may develop coping mechanisms to avoid using the affected fingers.