HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Prepare to get into the spirit of the season in a healthy way. “This is not a good time to diet, but you can set the achievable goal of maintaining your weight rather than trying to lose,” Humbaugh said. Drink plenty of water. If you stay hydrated, you are less likely to overeat.


Don’t worry if you’re not a mathematician when it comes to figuring out your BMI. Even though knowing this number is helpful, you still want to take other factors into consideration. “It is not the perfect measure, so it can be used in conjunction with other measures like blood pressure, genetics and cholesterol,” Humbaugh said.


HOW TO CALCULATE BMI


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the BMI is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of their height in meters.

WHAT IS A HEALTHY BODY MASS INDEX

JAMIE LOBER



Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine


If you wonder how you can know if you are at a healthy weight, figure out your body mass index (BMI).


“Body mass index is a measure that takes into account both your height and your weight,” said Dr. Kraig Humbaugh, commissioner of health and a pediatrician with the Lexington- Fayette County Health Department.


“Generally, a BMI over 25 is considered overweight,” Humbaugh said. The National Institute of Health says a BMI below 18.5 is underweight; a BMI between 18.5-24.9 is normal; and 30 or greater is obese.


BMI is more than a number. “The problem with a high body mass index is that you are at higher risk for health conditions like diabetes, arthritis, liver disease and heart disease,” Humbaugh said.


Staying at a healthy BMI depends on your lifestyle. “Eat right and exercise,” Humbaugh said. “Mind your portions, eat more fruits and vegetables, start an exercise routine with your doctor’s approval and stick to the schedule.”


Be sure to get adequate sleep as well. “Sleep is important because if you are not getting enough sleep it can trigger your body to think you need to eat more,” Humbaugh said.