BATTLING BALDNESS

Some men look in the mirror and regard a receding hairline with distress, wondering if there is a cure for baldness. Currently, the only truly effective medically proven way to arrest hair loss is to lower dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels. DHT is a form of testosterone that regulates beard growth and hair loss. Higher levels of DHT produce fuller beards at the cost of male pattern baldness. Lower levels of DHT ensure a full head of hair at the cost of the inability to grow a beard.

….FULL ARTICLE

HACKING THE HUMAN BRAIN

Many people enjoy visiting various Web sites and apps that challenge the brain by luring them deeper and deeper into cyber space. Cyber addiction comes in several forms, but all impact the brain. The past two decades have acquainted many people with the concept of hacking. It is why people strive to protect their computers and smartphones from outside sources trying to break in to steal information, implant malware and preocupy their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

HEART ATTACK AND MEN

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than one in three adult men has heart disease. Men around the age of 55 years are more likely than women to experience a heart attack.  Men often ignore the symptoms of a heart attack because they are uncertain about what they are feeling and don’t want to be embarrassed by a simple diagnosis, such as heartburn. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50 percent of men who die from coronary heart disease....

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness



Asking for help is difficult, but without assistance, depression is not likely to go away and may get worse. Depression and suicidal ideation, even if severe, usually improve with medication and/or psychotherapy. It is a sign of strength – not weakness – to ask for advice or seek help when you need it.


When depression worsens, suicidal thoughts are much more prevalent. To better manage depression:



If your depression is manifesting in the form of suicidal ideation, talk with someone and make a pact that you will call them if you are tempted to commit suicide.


Sources and Resources


•  Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.org)

•  Medline Plus (www.medlineplus.gov)

•  National Institute of Mental Health  (www.nimh.nih.gov)

Men, are you feeling sad and withdrawn? Do you notice you are not being social these days or you’re working all the time? Are you drinking too much? These may be clues that you have depression. And you may be at risk for suicide.


Depression affects men and women differently. For men, depression may be marked by unhealthy coping or escapist behaviors; too much drinking; or controlling, resistant, abusive behaviors such as reckless driving. Male depression may go unnoticed — and undiagnosed — and could lead to devastating consequences, including suicide.


Women attempt suicide more often, but men die at more than three times the rate and are more likely to follow through effectively, usually with a gun or other lethal method. A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates overall suicide rates rose 24 percent in the past 15 years, but the rate of suicides were much higher for men ages 45 to 64 years and jumped by 43 percent during that time frame.


There are multiple causes for the increases in this group. Men are typically reticent about getting help for medical matters and particularly for mental health issues. And the economic stress over the past decade, including recessions, job losses and downsizing, may have hit older men much more drastically. Depression and suicidal tendencies in elderly males is a widespread problem, with 80 percent of suicides

WE ARE LOSING OUR MEN TO SUICIDE

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health & Wellness magazines.

more articles by jean jeffers

in this age group consisting of white males. In older adults, life changes may increase the risk for depression or make existing depression worse. These changes include a move to a retirement community, chronic illness or pain, children moving away, a spouse or close friend passing away and loss of independence.


Symptoms of depression may fool you. Someone may have difficulty sleeping, tiredness, irritability and an increase in substance abuse. He may be isolating himself from friends and family or giving away possessions.


If you think a loved one is displaying depressive symptoms and is at risk for suicide, do not leave him alone. Start a gentle, caring conversation and ask what is going on in his life. Tell him you have noticed a change and you are concerned. Be prepared to listen more than you talk. Encourage him to talk to someone he trusts if he does not open up to you, such as a minister or a trained mental health professional. See if he is willing to get help, or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 to reach trained personnel.