PAP SMEAR: TEST LOOKS FOR PRESENCE OF PRECANCEROUS CELLS

A Pap smear is a procedure that screens for cervical cancer. Most women should start getting Pap smears at age 21 years and every three years after. It should be a part of your annual physical exam. The test looks for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix, the opening of the uterus or womb. During the procedure, cells from the cervix are scraped away. It is not painful and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. You may bleed a little after the test is completed.

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WHAT IS A MEDICARE WELLNESS EXAM?

A Medicare Wellness Exam is a preventative screening visit your provider wants you to have once a year. This visit is free and is separate from your annual physical exam (if your plan covers annual physicals). Traditional Medicare does not pay for a physical – it only covers a Wellness Exam.  What is a Wellness Exam? The visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since your last visit). It is designed to help prevent disease and disability based on your current health....

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ORAL HERPES

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, ….

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COVID-19 UPDATE: VACCINATIONS ARE HERE TO HELP

All the COVID-19 vaccines being used have gone through rigorous studies to ensure they are as safe as possible. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19, so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States have been shown to be highly effective at preventing COVID-19. Based on what is known about vaccines for other diseases and early data from clinical trials, experts believe getting a COVID-19 vaccine may also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. The vaccine creates an antibody response without patients having to experience sickness. It will work with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed.


Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly those who are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccination is a safer way to help build protection. Even if have you already had a COVID-19 infection, you should still be vaccinated because reinfection with COVID-19 is possible, although rare.


In the meantime, as we await the vaccine – and even after you receive it – we

still advocate, along with the CDC, that you continue to practice safety protocols: wearing a mask (covering both nose and mouth), social distancing (staying 6 feet away from others), washing your hands often and avoiding crowds. The combination of getting vaccinated and following the CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

DR. JAMES ROSSI



Dr. James Rossi graduated magna cum laude from the University of Kentucky with a bachelor’s of science degree in kinesiology in 2013. He then graduated from the UK medical school in 2017, where he completed his residency in family medicine in May 2020. Dr. Rossi is trained in all aspects of family medicine and primary care, including management of acute and chronic conditions. He is available to see patients of all ages at both our Hamburg and Brannon Crossing offices.

With almost 25 million COVID-19 cases reported in the United States, the pandemic shows no signs of slowing down. The good news is there are now vaccines available to help fight it.


Family Practice Associates of Lexington has completed the steps required by the Kentucky State Department of Health to receive the vaccines. We are currently awaiting further instructions. We have not received any information about how many vaccines we will receive for patients nor have we received the recommended guidelines for administration of the vaccines. The availability of the vaccine and the priority guidelines will be determined by the government, not by our office. We are unable to keep a waiting list for patients wanting the vaccine at this time. Please do not call about vaccine availability. Go to www.fpalex.com/covid for updates.


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), both COVID-19 vaccines authorized for emergency use in the United States – Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna – are two-dose series. The second dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should be administered three weeks (21 days) after the first dose of the vaccine, and the second dose of the Moderna vaccine should be administered four weeks (28 days) after the first dose. There is a risk the initial protection will decline if the administration of a second dose is delayed, so be sure to keep your follow-up appointment. Do not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval.