HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

….FULL ARTICLE

10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

….FULL ARTICLE

FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. About 64 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of COPD. In the United States, about 15 million adults have COPD.


There is a growing body of research evidence (Burgess, Kunik, Stanley, 2005) that COPD is a physical condition with significant psychosocial consequences. The stigma arises because individuals’ behavior, such as smoking, is associated with those who have COPD, holding them responsible for their disease. To add to this, persons with COPD are often supplied with oxygen equipment. They experience some bodily changes and sometimes face a disruption in their social interactions.


Having COPD can create for both patient and family an extremely distressing lifestyle. For the patient, CPOD can result in anxiety, panic and, in some cases, functional depression because of breathing difficulties. Anxiety is sometimes displayed in restlessness, muscle tension, loss of concentration and irritability. Physical symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pains, tingling sensations, trembling, feelings of faintness and choking can perpetuate the patient’s anxiety and lead to panic disorder. Professional care may be necessary if the symptoms persist. Failure to discuss these complications with your primary care physician or health care provider can lead to more serious mental health issues. The symptoms of depression associated with COPD include loss

UNDERSTANDING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES OF COPD

of interest or pleasure in every-day activities, sleep disturbances, weight changes, fatigue, poor concentration and, in some rare cases, thoughts of death.


There are effective treatment options that can help you manage COPD. Treatment choices include both drug and non-drug protocols that are suitable for emotional problems. The non-drug treatment options include short-term psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral interventions. It is often beneficial for both patient and caregiver to participate in this level of care. A credentialed psychotherapist can help the patient and caregiver better understand the links between the symptoms of COPD itself, psychological overlying factors and managing COPD.


Sources and Resources:

Berger, P. (2006). Social changes and stigma in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Burgess, K. Kunik, S. and Stanley, B. (2005). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Assessing and treating psychological issues in patients with COPD. Geriatrics, 1818-1821.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller