IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

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DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

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SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

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UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION IN WOMEN

themselves sad, angry and irritable. Postpartum depression is a serious medical condition requiring prompt treatment. It occurs in about 12 percent of women. If you recognize feelings of depression, talk to your family physician, internist, nurse practitioner, obstetrician or gynecologist about your symptoms. He or she can refer you to a mental health professional who specializes in diagnosing and treating depression.


Sources and Resources


•  Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.org)



DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller

Depression is a common but serious mood disorder. It reveals itself through symptoms such as hopelessness, pessimism, irritability, guilt, helplessness and decreased energy or fatigue lasting at least two weeks or longer. About twice as many women as men experience depression. Several factors may increase a woman’s risk of depression.


Some mood changes and depressed feelings occur with normal hormonal changes women experience, although these alone don’t cause depression. Other factors, such as personal life circumstances, can lead to a risk of depression.


Pubescence may increase some girls’ chances of developing depressive symptoms. Post-puberty depression rates are higher in females than in males. Because girls typically reach puberty before boys do, they’re more likely to develop depression at an earlier age than boys. This depression gender gap lasts until after menopause. The exact interaction between depression and premenstrual syndrome remains unclear. It’s possible cyclical changes in estrogen, progesterone and other hormones can disrupt the function of brain chemicals such as serotonin that control mood. Inherited traits, life experiences and other factors appear to play a role as well.


During pregnancy, hormonal changes occur that can affect mood. Many new mothers experience crying spells after giving birth or find