ANSWERS TO COMMON FITNESS QUESTIONS

We all have fitness questions, whether we’re new to working out or have been at it for a while. Here are the answers to some common fitness questions.  How Often Should I Work Out?  Everyone should commit to working out a minimum of three days a week to see results. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends a minimum of 150 minutes of high-intensity cardio, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise or a combination of moderate and vigorous-intensity exercise per week.

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EXERCISE: THE KEY TO A LONG LIFE

Do you want to live a long and healthy life? Be strong and agile as you age? Enjoy life into your 90s?  The key to a lengthy, prosperous life is exercise. No matter your age – whether you’re 16 or 65 – you should begin now with an exercise program or step up the one you already have. Studies have shown exercising on a regular basis is part of a healthier and more rewarding senior life. Staying active may affect how long you live and how energetic and vital you remain. Exercise provides a kind of health insurance.

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THE KNOWLEDGE TO BUILD A BETTER BODY

Kevin Balcirak is not playing around when it comes to fitness and health.

For the past 20 years, Balcirak (pronounced Ball-sir-rack) has owned and operated Body Structure in Lexington. While a 5-second Google search will yield a long list of gyms in the Bluegrass, Body Structure among them, Balcirak’s concept is quite different from the rest.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Anxiety disorders are complex. They often interfere with daily life and may last a lifetime, especially if left untreated. A significant number of people do not seek help, at least not until the problem becomes very uncomfortable. Professional help can make a difference, but there is much someone can do on his or her own along with the assistance of an expert. The following activities often help those with anxiety:


•  Consult your family doctor and have a physical to make sure nothing else is wrong that could be contributing to the anxiety.

•  See a mental health expert for an evaluation. It is impossible for the layperson to accurately diagnose his or her particular type of anxiety.

•  Avoid caffeine, alcohol, smoking and recreational drugs.

•  Practice stress management, relaxation techniques and deep-breathing exercises. Give yourself a time out. Do something relaxing, such as listening to music.

•  Start an exercise program. Physical activity may have a calming effect.

•  Aim for seven to eight hours of sleep at night.

•  Give your medication a chance before giving up on it, and do not go off it without your physician’s OK.

•  Create a support network.

Emily burst into her parents’ bedroom one night, crying and moaning. “I think I’m dying,” she gasped, clutching her chest. Her heart was pounding wildly and sweat soaked her nightshirt. Her mother called 911 when Emily fell to the floor in a daze. This was not some exotic West African disease; this was a panic attack.


Daniel Watson, MSW, LISW, says depression was at one time the most common mental health problem in the United States. Today anxiety has surpassed depression to become the No. 1 mental health problem in this country. Anxiety disorders affect 40 million adults (18 percent of the population) yearly. The National Institute of Health says about one in five adults are affected.


Daniel A. Barlow, in his book, “Anxiety and Its Disorders” (2004) says there are different types of anxiety:


•  Generalized Anxiety Disorder — chronic, excessive, uncontrollable worry. Symptoms include restlessness, irritation and fatigue.


•  Social Phobia — a marked fear and avoidance of social situations. Feeling hopeless and obsessing about being watched are characteristics of social phobia.  

THE MANY FACES OF ANXIETY

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health & Wellness magazines.

more articles by jean jeffers

•  Panic Disorder — recurrent, unexpected, intense panic attacks the patient often mistakes for a more serious malady.


•  Agoraphobia — fear and/or avoidance of situations due to severe stress when in a place other than home.


•  Specific Phobias — fear and/or avoidance of objects or situations. Here, excessive, constant fear of an event is prominent, such as riding in an elevator.


•  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) — reliving a trauma repeatedly or having a recurring distressing dream or flashbacks of a traumatic event.


•  Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) — a person with OCD may have frequent unwanted thoughts (obsessions) or behaviors (compulsions) that create anxiety. A person with this disorder may check the oven frequently, wash his hands repeatedly or perform any number of activities obsessively, all to allay his anxiety.