THERMOGRAPHY: FUNCTIONAL VS. STRUCTURAL IMAGING

Many people are familiar with structural imaging such as ultrasounds, X-rays and mammograms. However, they aren’t as familiar with the thermography option. Thermography is a totally non-invasive option for breast and body screenings. It has been FDA approved since 1984 and is used as an adjunct to mammography for breast screenings.  This rapidly developing technology is used to detect and locate thermal abnormalities characterized by an increase or decrease found at....

….FULL ARTICLE

THE SHERLOCK HOLMES OF HEALTHCARE: ULTRASOUNDS AND THERMOGRAPHY

Ultrasound imaging and thermography are important aspects in healthcare – they definitely cover more than babies. Many diagnoses and treatment plans stem from ultrasound and thermography procedures.  Ultrasounds are used to see internal body structures, such as tendons, muscles, joints, blood vessels and internal organs to find the source of a disease. Ultrasound works by using sound waves with frequencies that are higher than those audible to humans.

….FULL ARTICLE

SLEEP APNEA CAN BE A SYMPTOM OF SOMETHING MORE SERIOUS

Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography is now offering home sleep study kits. You may be asking yourself why a diagnostic imaging center is introducing sleep testing. The human body is kind of like the old children’s rhyme: “The knee bone is connected to the thigh bone.” There’s more of a correlation than one may think.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Fitness Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE IMAGING ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT OF YOUR HEALTH: THE THYROID

Television personality Deborah Norville of Inside Edition recently announced the nodule on her thyroid, originally brought to her attention in 2004 by an observant viewer, is now cancerous. This got me thinking about the “Butterfly Effect” since, well, the thyroid gland is shaped like a butterfly.


The butterfly effect is a chaos theory that illustrates the idea that some complex systems (Norville’s thyroid cancer) exhibit unpredictable behaviors such that small variances in the initial conditions (a viewer’s observation and call in) could have profound and widely divergent effects/ outcomes. But just what does this little butterfly gland do and why should we pay attention to it – way before someone else has a chance to notice?


The thyroid gland is shaped, well, like a butterfly. It lies across the cartilage of the neck above the collar bone. Its job is to stimulate metabolism and, along with the parathyroid gland (beside or near the thyroid), it controls the body’s circulating calcium levels.


Many different disorders are associated with the thyroid. Basically there’s either too little or too much thyroid hormone. Although the symptoms are similar, the cause can be linked to the thyroid itself or issues with the hypothalamus or pituitary gland in the brain.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune disorder that causes hypothyroidism.


Too little hormone – HYPOTHYROIDISM – can have many causes; the most common is iodine insufficiency. On a cellular level, our bodies won’t metabolize food properly, resulting in:



Too much hormone – HYPERTHYROIDISM – can increase metabolism beyond a healthy level, resulting in:

Stimulation of the body’s sympathetic nervous system (ready-for-a-fight feeling)



Grave’s disease is the most common presentation of hyperthyroidism. You need to have a physical exam along with a blood test to evaluate whether that is your problem. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are the most common way to monitor thyroid health. However, a TSH blood panel may not reveal an issue. This is why a thyroid ultrasound is a very useful tool – just ask Deborah Norville. The ultrasound can show images of both lobes, or wings, as well as the isthmus, the bridge that connects the gland. The images can detect normal vs. abnormal tissue and measure specific growths or goiters caused by excessive production. Once a nodule is detected, it may be rescanned at various intervals to determine any growth or anatomical changes over time. As in many areas of medicine, how often for how long is up for debate, but currently, it appears to be a six-month follow-up scan initially, then following up through three years. Ultrasound is also commonly used to guide the needle into the nodule during a thyroid nodule biopsy.


It is estimated 27 million Americans have thyroid disease, and about 13 million are undiagnosed! Think about that. That little butterfly gland can cause so much chaos – and that is NOT a theory!


We wish Ms. Norville well following her thyroidectomy (removal of the thyroid). Her physicians followed that little butterfly for 15 years before the outcome. I am so proud to be a sonographer knowing the technology, skills and availability of this amazing diagnostic tool helps so many.


Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography has board-certified sonographers capable of producing high-quality images of your thyroid.

KIM DAVIES, RDMS, RDCS, RVS

With 40 years in the field of ultrasound, Kim Davis, RDMS, RDCS, RVS, is the founder and CEO of PCU, 152 W. Tiverton Way in Lexington. PCU can be reached at 859-554-7360 or at www.patientchoiceultrasound.com.

more articles by Kim Davis