IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

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DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

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SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

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will get honest answers from you and no question is considered dumb or off limits. Laying a good foundation of open conversation with your daughter now will make it easier when you move on to discussions that may include warnings against high-risk activity, including premarital sex.

What women tell their daughters about menstruation seems to be a generational thing. If you were born 65 or more years ago, your mother either told you nothing or gave you a lecture in such detail that you had no idea what she was talking about. If you were born in the 1990s or later, your mother probably told you all about it in terms she understood. Maybe you understood, maybe you did not.


Most teenagers agree it would be easier to postpone high-risk activity if they had more open, honest conversations with their parents. Telling your daughter about menstruation before she has her first period is near the top of necessary mother/daughter conversations and could ease the way for more in-depth talks as she grows older.


Menstruation, or the menstrual cycle, is the monthly flow of blood and cellular debris from the non-pregnant uterus. It begins at puberty in all women. The bleeding, often referred to as a period, usually lasts from three to seven days. A woman’s first menstrual period may come as early as 8 years of age, though age 11 or 12 years is more usual. Occasionally a girl will not menstruate until as late as age 16 years. Some menstrual discomfort is common; sometimes intensely painful cramping occurs. The onset of menstruation is the body’s way of announcing it is mature enough to incubate a baby. Menstrual periods cease permanently usually between the ages of 45 and 55 years, a stage of life called menopause.

TALKING TO YOUR DAUGHTER ABOUT MENSTRUATION

MARTHA EVANS SPARKS

Martha Evans Sparks is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by martha evans sparks

One good way to start a discussion about menstruation with a young girl is to create an occasion to walk past a display of sanitary napkins or tampons in a store. Ask a casual question about whether the girl knows what these products are used for. Bear in mind your child may have already heard some things from her friends. But whatever her level of knowledge, as her mother and true friend, be open, factual and truthful.


In the conversation, it may be well to introduce her to a new word – puberty. Tell her it means her body has entered a new stage of growth and change. One of the changes puberty brings is the beginning of some bleeding that will come from an opening in her lower body.


Be sure to use correct language, never cute or crude euphemisms. You could end the discussion by purchasing some sanitary products for future use.


This is not a one-time conversation. It should be an ongoing discussion. Watch for teachable moments. Be an “askable,” accessible parent. Be ready to answer questions such as, “Do boys have periods, too?” Assure your daughter you are for her if she has cramps, heavy periods or more questions. She should know she