NEW TECHNOLOGY INSTRUMENTAL IN RECOVERING FROM CONCUSSION

Professional sports teams, as well as high school and college teams, are increasing their awareness and protocols for assessing acquired brain injury, also known as concussions. Teams want to be sure their athletes are 100 percent ready to return to the field after suffering a concussion.  One crucial thing a concussion does is affect your ability to point your eyes, so a prime way to evaluate the severity of a hit is through eye tracking. Eye tracking measures the eyes’ ability to work together.

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VISION THERAPY AND ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY

The eye is amazing. Did you know more than 1.9 million fibers come from the eye into the brain? Each of those fibers creates its own pathway to the brain and has its own distinct function. So when someone has a stroke or other acquired brain injury (ABI), vision is often affected.  ABIs include concussions suffered in severe sports-related hits or a car accident, as well as cerebral or vascular strokes. An ABI can affect both neurological pathways in the eye, the focal or parvocellular pathway, which is....

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SYNTONICS: CREATING BALANCE FOR THE EYES

Syntonics, or optometric phototherapy, is a form of light therapy used to treat a variety of vision problems. It is available at Family Eyecare Associates to help patients with a variety of vision problems, such as strabismus (eye turns), amblyopia (lazy eye), focusing and convergence problems and learning disorders. It has also been shown to be very effective for people who suffer from migraines.

….FULL ARTICLE

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SYNTONICS: CREATING BALANCE FOR THE EYES

Syntonics, or optometric phototherapy, is a form of light therapy used to treat a variety of vision problems. It is available at Family Eyecare Associates to help patients with a variety of vision problems, such as strabismus (eye turns), amblyopia (lazy eye), focusing and convergence problems and learning disorders. It has also been shown to be very effective for people who suffer from migraines.


The term syntonics was derived from the word syntony, which means to bring the body into balance. It was coined by Dr. H. Riley Spitler, who studied the relationship between light and the eyes in biological function and development. Most of the current therapeutic techniques used in syntonics are based on his work. The concept is that every length of light has its own set of energy receptors in the eye. Spitler maintained the red light at one end of the visible spectrum stimulated the sympathetic nervous system and the indigo light at the other end activated the parasympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system controls functions such as blood pressure and heart rate – the fight-or-flight responses – while the parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for stimulating rest-and-digest activities. Researchers say short-term syntonic treatment can significantly improve visual skills, peripheral vision, memory, behavior, mood, general performance and academic achievement. Syntonics creates a balanced diet for the eyes because it equalizes the focal and ambient visual systems. Applying certain frequencies of light by way of the eyes

can restore balance in the regulatory centers of the body’s nervous system.


One of the diagnostic tests used to determine the need for syntonic treatment is pupil testing, specifically a function of the pupil called pupillary release. A penlight is held in front of the patient’s eye. The pupil should constrict and stay small for at least 10 seconds. Fast pupillary release occurs with autonomic nervous system imbalances and reduced functional visual fields. A reduced functional visual field is a prime source of vision problems, causing the patient difficulty in processing information properly and creating learning and performance deficits. Functional field constrictions can improve with syntonic treatment, which often leads to increased patient functional/binocular vision. Syntonics is another way of calming the neurocentric system.


A typical syntonic treatment session requires the patient to sit in a darkened room and focus on a circle of colored light in a devise called a syntonizer. The syntonizer is a long black tube that cuts out all other light and allows the optometrist to control light frequency and monitor pupil response. The treatment takes 20 minutes – 10 minutes with a treatment lens, then 10 minutes with a

balancing lens. The color of the light used in the device is based on the type of vision problem the patient has. The light can either be steady or strobed. A general syntonic treatment plan involves a span of 30 sessions over several weeks. Contact Family Eyecare Associates for more information or an appointment to see just how syntonics works.

DR. RICK GRAEBE

Dr. Graebe received both his B.S degree in Visual Science and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University. He is a Behavioral Optometrist and learning expert. He has been in private practice here in the Bluegrass area for the past 32 years.

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