GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.  Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue.

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A DIET FOR HEALTH & WEIGHT LOSS

Have you noticed? Look around and you’ll see a majority of Americans who are either overweight or obese. Look in supermarkets and you’ll see a plethora of food products, many of them processed or high-fat and/or sweet laden.  Consuming such a diet often leads to poor health and weight gain. It is not surprising that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. A number of diseases, including pre-diabetes, diabetes, stroke and depression, are linked to how we eat .....

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ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.

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•  Never let your child swim  during a storm.


•  Swimming aids such as water wings or noodles are fun toys, but they should not be used in place of a U.S. Coast Guard approved personal floatation device (PFD).


•  Don’t let your kids jump in water less than 9 feet deep, and no diving unless the water depth is 12 feet or more.


•  No running, pushing or dunking.


•  Don’t chew gum or eat when in the water.


•  Always ensure there is a life guard on duty, whether you’re at the beach or pool. Check to make sure there is appropriate safety equipment handy, such as a ring buoy or reaching pole, a cell phone, life jackets and a first-aid kit.


•  Swimming instructors should be trained in CPR and certified by the Red Cross or another reputable program.  

Having fun and beating the heat this summer may mean spending time with your kids swimming. However, before getting into the pool, lake or ocean, it is important to know about swimming safety and to take appropriate precautions to prevent any accident or injuries.


“Keep in mind, drowning is silent,” said Chris Vitale, RN, MSN, injury prevention manager at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “Children younger than 4 should be within arm’s reach of an adult at all times, and children over the age of 4, even if they know how to swim, should always have an adult’s eyes on them.”


According to experts, kids need to know how to swim. School-age kids can follow directions and listen, so working with a trained instructor or parent can boost their confidence in the water. Here are some swimming safety tips for kids:


•  Introduce babies to water when they are around 6 months of age. Over time, teach them how to tread water and float and insist they stay near the shore. They should be made aware of river currents, uneven surfaces, ocean undertow and changing weather.


•  Never leave a small child unattended near water, and don’t trust a child’s life to another child. Teach kids to seek permission to go near the water.

SWIMMING SAFETY FOR KIDS

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh


•  Stay within arm’s reach of your child at all times. If there are many adults present when kids are swimming, use the Water Watcher strategy, which designates an adult as the Water Watcher for a certain time period to prevent lapses in supervision.


•  Ensure backyard pools have four-sided fencing that is at least 4 feet high and a self-closing, self-latching gate to prevent kids from wandering into the pool area unsupervised. Install alarms to alert you in case a child wanders into the pool area. Many kids who drown in home pools were out of sight for less than five minutes and in the care of one or both parents at the time.