DESIGNING A HEALTHY DIET FOR THE NEW YEAR

Every year, millions of Americans make New Year’s resolutions. The majority of these resolutions focus on diet in attempts to lose weight and be healthier. A new year is the perfect time to jumpstart a healthy diet to make the changes you want to see for yourself throughout the year. However, research shows 80 percent of resolutions fail by February. Many people strive for unrealistic goals, which ultimately set them up for failure.

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EXERCISE HAS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON THE BRAIN

While exercise has long been known for its positive effects on physical health and its ability to heighten energy and help manage chronic health problems such as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, exercise is now being lauded for its beneficial effects on the brain.   These benefits touch almost every aspect of life. Exercise helps sharpen short-term memory and improve long-term memory. This happens because exercise can reduce insulin resistance and inflammation and stimulate….

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GETTING STARTED AND STICKING WITH IT

As we kick off 2018, you may be thinking about resolutions pertaining to your health and fitness. It’s easy to determine some ways to improve your physical, mental and emotional well-being. However, it’s not always as simple to stay motivated and make the new commitments part of your lifestyle. Now is the perfect time to set goals, whether it be for the number of days you intend to work out each week, how many steps you want to take each day or healthy meals you want to prepare for your family.

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It’s time for fun in the sun. But with summer comes some risks. Follow these tips to stay healthy and happy this season.


Sun Protection

Too much ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is harmful to the skin. It can cause a sunburn or, worse, skin cancer – the most common type of cancer in the United States. Protect yourself and your children by wearing hats and clothing that cover exposed skin when going to the lake, beach or pool. Wear sunglasses to protect the eyes and surrounding skin. And don’t forget the sunscreen. The sun protection factor (SPF) is the product’s level of ultraviolet B waves (UVB) protection. UVB rays are the main cause of sunburns. An SPF of 30 will make 30 minutes in the sun equal to one minute of UVB exposure. The higher the SPF, the smaller the difference in protection. Broad  spectrum sunscreens additionally protect against UVA. Apply sunscreen generously to all exposed skin, including the face, ears and neck at least every two hours.


Mosquitoes

Mosquito bites can be annoying, and they can also lead to illness. Insect repellents with the ingredient DEET are the most effective. DEET doesn’t kill mosquitoes but it keeps them away. “All repellents are tested to see if they beat DEET,” said Dr. Mustapha Debboun, director of the mosquito control division of Harris County Public Health and Environmental

SUMMERTIME SAFETY

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

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Services in Houston. Follow the label directions for how often to reapply repellent; the higher the concentration of DEET the longer it will last.


Food Safety

Higher temperatures can cause foodborne illnesses. When bringing food along for a picnic, use an insulated cooler filled with ice or frozen gel packs. Keep raw meat, poultry, seafood, deli and luncheon meats or sandwiches, cold salads made with mayonnaise or eggs, tuna, chicken, pasta and egg salads, cut fruit and vegetables and any dairy products at the correct cold temperature. A full cooler will retain its cold temperature longer than a partially filled one. Keep the cooler out of direct sun exposure and avoid repeatedly opening it to maintain the temperature longer. Perishable food should not sit out more than two hours. In weather above 90 degrees, food should never sit out for more than one hour. Serve cold food in small portions and keep the rest in the cooler.