HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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SLEEP ONSET - A CONTRIBUTOR TO BETTER HEART HEALTH?

There was a 12-percent greater risk of cardiovascular disease for those who began sleeping between 11-11:59 p.m.; and a 24-percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease for those who fell asleep before 10 p.m. The association between sleep onset and cardiovascular risk was higher among female subjects than among male subjects.


The conclusion based on the data collected suggests a consistent bedtime routine, as well as exercising and eating on a routine basis, can help individuals fall asleep at a healthy hour. For many people, bedtime is whenever they can fall asleep. The timing of sleep onset is a contributor to good cardiovascular health. Further research is necessary to clarify if a person who goes to sleep too early or too late will adversely increase cardiovascular risks.


Studies have shown lack of sleep is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. People who get fewer than 7 hours of sleep nightly are at a higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, type 2 diabetes and obesity, according to the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There is an increasing body of evidence that indicates when we sleep, in addition to how we sleep, may also be an important factor contributing to cardiovascular health.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

Consistency with your bedtime routine can help you fall asleep at an optimal time. Researchers say falling asleep between 10-11 p.m. is the best time for heart health (Shahram, Reed, Dillon et al., 2021). These researchers suggest optimum bedtime fits well with circadian rhythms and daylight exposure. In their research, they found going to sleep between those hours is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes.


Their study was published in the European Heart Journal, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. It involved more than 88,000 people aged 43 to 79 years of age who agreed to collect data on their bedtime and wake-up time over a seven-day period using an accelerometer. Participants completed demographic, lifestyle, health and physical assessments. Researchers then tracked the study group over a 5.7-year period for diagnoses of cardiovascular disease, such as a heart attack, heart failure, chronic ischemic heart disease, stroke and transient ischemic attack.


Results indicated only 3 percent of the study subjects later developed cardiovascular disease. The incidence was highest in those with sleep times at midnight or later and lowest in those with sleep onset between 10-10:59 p.m. It further found that, compared with sleep onset during this 10-11 p.m. timeframe, there was a 25-percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease among those who fell asleep at midnight or later.