HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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SLEEP HELPS HEART HEALTH

importance of improving overall sleep patterns to help prevent heart failure.”


The researchers also found the risk of heart failure was 8 percent lower in early risers; 12 percent lower in those who slept seven to eight hours daily; 17 percent lower in those who did not have frequent insomnia; and 34 percent lower in those reporting no daytime sleepiness.


Lack of sleep can increase insulin resistance, a risk factor in developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Adults who sleep less than seven hours each night are more likely to have health problems, including heart attack, asthma and depression. Some health problems, such as high blood pressure, raise the risk for heart disease, heart attack and stroke. During normal sleep, your blood pressure goes down. If you are having sleep problems, your blood pressure stays higher for a longer amount of time. Lack of sleep can lead to unhealthy weight gain. This is especially true for children and adolescents, who need more sleep than adults. Not getting enough sleep may affect a part of the brain that controls hunger.


HERE ARE SOME TIPS FOR GETTING A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP:


Adults with the healthiest sleep patterns had a 42-percent lower risk of heart  failure, regardless of other risk factors, compared to adults with unhealthy sleep patterns, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s flagship journal Circulation.


Healthy sleep patterns include rising in the morning, sleeping seven to eight hours a day and having no frequent insomnia, snoring or excessive daytime sleepiness. Heart failure affects more than 26 million people, and emerging evidence indicates sleep problems may play a role in the development of heart failure.


An observational study examined the relationship between healthy sleep patterns and heart failure utilizing participants ages 37 to 73 years. Researchers analyzed their sleep quality as well as overall sleep patterns. The measures of sleep quality included sleep duration, insomnia and snoring and other sleep-related features, such as whether the participant was an early bird or a night owl and if they had any daytime sleepiness (likely to unintentionally doze off or fall asleep during the daytime).


“The healthy sleep score we created was based on the scoring of these five sleep behaviors,” said Lu Qi, M.D., Ph.D., corresponding author and professor of epidemiology and director of the Obesity Research Center at Tulane University in New Orleans. “Our findings highlight the