IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

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DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

….FULL ARTICLE

SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Gingivitis or gum inflammation leads to periodontitis or bone loss, which progresses at a slow pace. Logically, if you prevent or reduce the gum inflammation, you reduce bone loss or prevent periodontal disease.


According to the American Dental Association (ADA), even a small benefit is good, considering the fact that half of the American population suffers from periodontal disease. Moreover, the guidelines do not in any way rule out the recommendations of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which accepts the importance of flossing.


If performed properly, flossing only does you good. A tooth has five surfaces; your toothbrush can only reach three of them. Only by flossing can you get access in between your teeth. The only time you should not floss is when you start feeling pain while flossing, but this generally happens only when you do it aggressively. There is a correct technique for flossing. Many people move the floss in a sawing motion. The right way is to move it up and down around the sides of the teeth, forming a “C” shape around the tooth, and going below the gum line.

To floss or not to floss – that is the question. This is the dilemma people are facing, especially after reading about the latest change in dental guidelines for Americans that was released in August 2016.


The change is based on certain reports that say the evidence of any benefits of flossing is very low quality or weak and unreliable because of fewer research studies and small sample sizes. Recent reviews concluded flossing is not very effective in plaque removal and reduction of gum inflammation.


But many dental experts still emphasize cleaning between the teeth at least once a day. To them, weak evidence of the benefits of flossing does not mean that flossing is useless.


So just what is flossing and why do dentists recommend it?


When food particles get stuck in the gap between the teeth and along the gum line, they rot and form plaque full of bacteria. This region is difficult to reach with your toothbrush, and that dental plaque causes gum disease. If the plaque is not removed with the help of a toothbrush or an interdental cleaner such as floss, it will harden into calculus or tartar. Flossing removes bacteria or plaque and food particles. This helps you avoid plaque build-up, tooth decay and gum disease.

SHOULD YOU FLOSS?

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh

Some experts say small inter-dental brushes are best for people who have spaces between their teeth. However, if the spaces between your teeth are too tight, flossing is a better option for cleaning the area. Talk to your dentist for more information.