HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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another, it can cause chickenpox in someone who has never had it. So you may want to be extra careful if you’re around grandchildren or young people who have not contacted chickenpox.


Sources:


SENIORS, WATCH OUT FOR SHINGLES


In some cases, if shingles invades the eye, it may result in facial scarring and, in rare instances, loss of vision. Shingles can also result in long-lasting pain called postherpetic neuralgia (or PHN). With PHN, nerve fibers that have been inflamed or damaged by shingles continue to send pain signals to your brain months or even years after the blisters have disappeared. The older you are when you get shingles, the more likely you are to develop PHN.


There is a vaccine against shingles available, so talk to your doctor about it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends all adults age 50 years or older with healthy immune systems get vaccinated, even if you are not sure whether you ever had chickenpox. You will need to get two doses of the shingles vaccine called Shingrix (recombinant zoster vaccine), separated by two to six months, to prevent shingles and its complications. There is no maximum age for getting Shingrix. Even if you had shingles in the past, the vaccine can help prevent future occurrences.


While shingles is not contagious and cannot be passed from one person to

Remember when you had chickenpox as a kid? You may have thought once it was gone, it was gone for good. However, chickenpox can come back in the form of shingles when you’re an adult.


Shingles lurks out there for many people. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant (inactive) in the body. According to the National Institutes of Health, one out of three people over age 60 years will get shingles, and 50 percent of all Americans will experience this disease before they’re 80 years old. Because the immune system weakens as we age, the risk for shingles increases as you get older.


What is shingles? Also known as herpes zoster, shingles is a viral infection that occurs when the inactive chickenpox virus (varicella zoster virus) reactivates. Almost every U.S. adult age 50 years or older is infected with this virus. Shingles usually starts out as severe pain, burning or tingling on one side of your body. It later develops into an itchy, painful rash and possibly blisters. The rash usually appears as a single stripe on either the left or right side of the face or body, following a nerve path. It could develop on the torso, arms, thighs or head. While most of the time the rash lasts only two to four weeks, it can also develop into a chronic, debilitating pain that lingers even after the rash clears up. While the rash is present, you can get relief from the symptoms by taking cool showers and avoiding direct sunlight. Just as they told you when you were a child, try to resist scratching the rash. This can lead to a bacterial skin infection.