AUDIBEL PROMOTES HEARING HEALTH

According to hearing health providers, nearly one in five Americans age 12 years and older – 48 million people – experience hearing loss severe enough to hinder communication. Hearing loss is the third most prevalent age-related disability in adults age 75 years plus, following arthritis and hypertension. Only 5 percent of hearing loss in adults can be improved medically or surgically. The vast majority of Americans with hearing loss are treated with hearing aids.

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TAKING CARE OF YOUR AGING SKIN

As you age, you may notice wrinkles and brown spots on your skin. Aging makes skin more prone to dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it less plump and smooth. Cuts and bruises might take longer to heal. How skin ages will depend on several factors: your heredity, lifestyle, diet and other personal habits, such as smoking. Sunlight is another major cause of skin aging.

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A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP IS GOOD FOR SENIOR HEALTH

For some seniors,getting a good night’s sleep is an everyday challenge. Some sleep specialists recommend seniors sleep about seven and a half hours on average, while others say seniors need to get as much sleep as they always have to function at their best. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) convened experts from the fields of sleep research, anatomy and physiology as well as pediatrics, neurology and gerontology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines.

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Building muscle mass is important in decreasing metabolic health risks. So adding some muscle and increasing your BMI by increasing your overall body weight could actually improve your health and decrease your risk of premature death. Increased muscle mass burns fat by increasing metabolism. A 2005 study compared people who did aerobics-only exercise with those who included strength training in their routine. After eight weeks, the aerobics-only group had lost 3 pounds of fat and half a pound of muscle. The group that combined aerobics and strength training had lost 10 pounds of fat and gained 2 pounds of calorie-burning muscle.


A great way to increase muscle mass at any age or fitness level is resistance training. Training using resistance to induce muscular contraction builds the strength, anaerobic endurance and size of skeletal muscles. Strength training:


SENIORS CAN BUILD MUSCLE MASS TO LIVE LONGER

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

body composition, rather than on BMI alone, when counseling older adults on preventative health behaviors.”


The researchers analyzed data collected by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) and focused on a group of 3,659 individuals that included men over age 55 years and women age 65 years or older at the time of the survey. From this pool, they isolated those who had died from natural causes based on a follow-up survey done in 2004. The researchers calculated the muscle mass relative to the person’s height, a value called muscle mass index, which is defined as muscle mass divided by height squared. The results were clear: People with more muscle mass were less likely to die of natural causes. Total mortality was significantly lower in the 25 percent of individuals with the greatest muscle mass index compared to the 25 percent with the lowest. “In other words, the greater your muscle mass, the lower your risk of death,” said the study’s co-author, Dr. Arun Karlamangla, an associate professor in the geriatrics division at the Geffen School. “Rather than worrying about weight or body mass index, we should be trying to maximize and maintain muscle mass.”

Total body mass includes both fat and muscle. Both have an effect on metabolism. You can distinguish between muscle and fat mass by using a bioelectrical impendence instrument, which measures opposition to the flow of an electric current through body tissues. Muscle and fat have different water content so electrical currents flow through them at different rates of speed. Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2014 found greater muscle mass and the metabolic stimulus it provides is associated with a lower mortality rate in older adults. Their findings add to the growing evidence that overall body composition is a better predictor of health and morbidity rates than the widely used body mass index (BMI).


“Muscle mass seems to be an important predictor of life expectancy, and maintaining lean muscle mass well beyond middle age can increase your life span,” said lead researcher Dr. Preethi Srikanthan, an assistant clinical professor in the endocrinology division at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.


This study is the culmination of previous UCLA research Srikanthan led. “As there is no gold- standard measure of body composition, several studies have addressed this question using different measurement techniques and obtained different results,” Srikanthan said at the time. “So many studies on the mortality impact of obesity focus on BMI. Our study indicates clinicians need to be focusing on ways to improve