HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness


See your eye care specialist yearly and more frequently if you have risk factors for retinal detachment. Be alert to symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters.


Sources:


RETINAL DETACHMENT

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60+ and Health & Wellness magazines. Her blog may be seen on her website at www.normajan.naiwe.com

more articles by jean jeffers

Retinal detachment is a very serious problem that usually results in blindness unless surgically treated. With retinal detachment, bleeding from nearby blood vessels adds to the problem, making vision that much more cloudy. Generally, the patient cannot see at all.


Treatment, which occurs soon after diagnosis, includes (for milder problems) a laser to seal the tears in the retina before the detachment occurs or a gas bubble that helps the retina float back in place. Treatment for severe detachment includes a scleral buckle used to push the eye wall up against the retina and removal of vitreous or scar tissue pulling on the retina (this method is used for the largest tears). Success depends on the location and extent of the detachment and how early the detachment is detected. If treated early, the results are usually better. If the macula is left undamaged, the prognosis is excellent.


Retinal detachment occurs more commonly with age. Cataract surgery may be a factor in the formation of the condition. Myopic patients are also more susceptible. Prevention includes protective eye wear to prevent eye trauma. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar levels.

The eye is a marvelous organ. Sight occurs when light rays enter the eye through the cornea. The cornea bends the light, which passes through the pupil, a size-changing hole in the iris. The iris works somewhat like a shutter in a camera, allowing light to pass through. After it passes through, the light hits the eye’s crystalline lens. The light rays are then focused onto the retina. The retina converts the light rays into impulses. These impulses travel through the optic nerve to the brain, where they are interpreted as images we see.


According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a healthy intact retina is the key to clear vision. A thick gel called the vitreous is attached to the retina. On occasion, clumps of gel in the vitreous cast a shadow on the retina and the individual sees small dots, specks, strings or clouds.


As we age, the vitreous may shrink and pull on the retina. When this occurs, the patient may notice flashing lights or have the sensation of seeing stars. While usually there is no problem with the vitreous as it moves away from the retina, once in a while the vitreous makes a forceful pull, tugging so hard it may cause one or more tears. If a tear in the retina happens, fluid may pass through, lifting the retina off the back of the eye. This process has been described as similar to wallpaper being peeled off a wall. When the retina is pulled from the back of the eye, it is called a retinal detachment. Symptoms include blurry vision and a shadow or blindness in part of the visual field.