GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.  Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue.

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A DIET FOR HEALTH & WEIGHT LOSS

Have you noticed? Look around and you’ll see a majority of Americans who are either overweight or obese. Look in supermarkets and you’ll see a plethora of food products, many of them processed or high-fat and/or sweet laden.  Consuming such a diet often leads to poor health and weight gain. It is not surprising that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. A number of diseases, including pre-diabetes, diabetes, stroke and depression, are linked to how we eat .....

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ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.

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do so for a short period of time. They learn some valuable lessons and incorporate them into their lifestyle down the road. Benefits come over time.


“We see people get stronger and lose weight, and a lot of our elderly population are able to walk up a flight of stairs without even holding on to the handrail,” said Miller.


Dedication is the key moving forward. To be successful, you need to stay committed to training. It is normal to want results quickly, but instant gratification does not happen.


“You are going to have to give yourself three to six months for a physique transformation if you do everything the right way,” Goodrich said. Also, you need to remember that making a change requires more than just exercise. “Diet is 80 percent of changing your body,” Goodrich said.


The hardest part is getting started, so encounter- ing some roadblocks is to be expected. “You have to give yourself at least two to three weeks to acclimate to your new lifestyle,” Goodrich said. “Your body is going to be shocked, sore and uncomfortable, but if you stick with it, you will be fine.”

If you’re looking for a safe, effective program that will help you get toned, become more flexible or lose weight, personal training could be for you.


A personal trainer will teach you proper form and technique to keep you safe and injury free. But first, he or she needs to know what your goals are – whether you want to lose weight, get healthy and tone up or train for bodybuilding, fitness competitions or powerlifting. Perhaps you’re an older person who wants to work on balance and stability.


 “First and foremost, I sit down and speak to potential clients for about 30 to 40 minutes in a consultation to get an idea of what their goals and lifestyle are, to get to know the person a little bit and explain about the program,” said Jason Goodrich, owner and fitness professional at Physiques ‘N’ Weeks (www.physiquesnweeks.com). “You have to map out a schedule and decide how many times a week you will train, go over food and diet, which is the most important thing, and explain that if they want to make a change in the way they feel, their physique and their health, they will have to put the effort in.”


“The trainer should find out what you want to do and make a plan that is practical,” said Melissa Miller of Transformation Personal Training.


Some people work with a trainer on and off for years while others

PERSONAL TRAINING

JAMIE LOBER

Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Jamie Lober