HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

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10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

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FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

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Sources and Resources:


•  American Cancer Society (2016). Learn About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

•  Oral Cancer Foundation (2017).

Oral cancer is often thought of as a disease that strikes older people or heavy smokers. But it is shocking for many people to learn nonsmoking young adults are the fastest growing segment of oral cancer patients. This is largely due to the rise in human Papillomavirus HPV-16 diagnoses among this group. According to the American Cancer Society, men face twice the risk of developing oral cancer as women, and men who are over age 50 face the greatest risk. It is estimated that over 40,000 people in the United States have received a diagnosis of oral cancer.


Cigarette, cigar or pipe smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop oral cancers. Smokeless tobacco users, along with those who use dip, snuff or chewing tobacco products, are 50 times more likely to develop cancers of the cheek, gums and lining of the lips. All these are addictive disorders and as a result often draw the attention of mental health and addictive disorder specialists. Still, it is important to note that over 25 percent of all oral cancers occur in people who do not smoke and who only drink alcohol occasionally.


More than 600,000 cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer are diagnosed each year worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. In the United States, more than 48,000 individuals will be diagnosed with this debilitating, disfiguring disease this year with 9,570 deaths, roughly one person an hour each day.

ORAL CANCER NEEDS YOUR IMMEDIATE ATTENTION

Cancer is defined as the uncontrollable growth of cells that invade and cause damage to surrounding tissue. Oral cancer appears as a growth or sore in the mouth that does not go away. It can be life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. Oral cancer includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses and pharynx.


It is important to be aware of the most common symptoms of oral cancer. These include any swellings, lumps or rough spots on the lips, gums or other areas inside the mouth. There may be velvety white, red or speckled patches in the mouth. Other symptoms are unexplained numbness, loss of feeling or pain and tenderness in any area of the face, mouth, or neck. Also be aware of any indications of soreness; a feeling that something is caught in the back of the throat; ear pain; or difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving the jaw or tongue. Finally, if you notice unexplained hoarseness, have a chronic sore throat, a change in your voice or unexplained bleeding in the mouth, see your dentist immediately.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller