Oral Herpes

PAP SMEAR: TEST LOOKS FOR PRESENCE OF PRECANCEROUS CELLS

A Pap smear is a procedure that screens for cervical cancer. Most women should start getting Pap smears at age 21 years and every three years after. It should be a part of your annual physical exam. The test looks for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix, the opening of the uterus or womb. During the procedure, cells from the cervix are scraped away. It is not painful and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. You may bleed a little after the test is completed.

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WHAT IS A MEDICARE WELLNESS EXAM?

A Medicare Wellness Exam is a preventative screening visit your provider wants you to have once a year. This visit is free and is separate from your annual physical exam (if your plan covers annual physicals). Traditional Medicare does not pay for a physical – it only covers a Wellness Exam.  What is a Wellness Exam? The visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since your last visit). It is designed to help prevent disease and disability based on your current health....

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ORAL HERPES

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, ….

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ORAL HERPES

difficult to eat and drink. In people in their teens and 20s, herpes may cause a sore throat with shallow ulcers and a grayish coating on the tonsils. The lesions usually crust over during the healing phase. Home-based treatment may include taking acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Your doctor may recommend a topical anesthetic to reduce the pain. Oral or IV medications do exist for herpes, but they are not recommended for people with a normal immune system. It is used only for people with weakened immune systems, infants younger than 6 weeks old or people who have a severe disease. There is no cure for the infection.


One risk involved with oral herpes is dehydration. If your mouth is too sore to allow you to drink, you can quickly become dehydrated. Symptoms of dehydration include a decrease in urination (fewer wet diapers in infants), drowsiness, irritability and dry mouth. Be sure to drink adequate fluids to prevent dehydration. The color of your urine could indicate whether you are hydrated enough.


The sores and symptoms of oral herpes completely clear up in two to three weeks, but they may reappear under certain emotionally or physically stressful situations. Ultraviolet light, illness, fatigue, hormonal changes, depression and trauma to a site or a nerve region where a previous HSV-1 infection occurred could also trigger a recurrence. If the first episode of oral herpes produced fairly mild symptoms, subsequent recurrences also tend to be mild.


HANNAH BRUGGER, ARPN

Family Practice Associates of Lexington, PSC is pleased to welcome Hannah Brugger, APRN to our office. Hannah comes to FPA with experience in emergency medicine and home care. After working for nearly five years as a hospital RN, Hannah decided to further her education and graduated from the University of Louisville as a Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner in May 2017. Hannah’s experience and personality make her an excellent fit for FPA. She enjoys women’s health and preventive medicine but can see patients 2 years of age and older.

more articles by Hannah Brugger

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, people of any age can contact them. Severe infection or disease complications occur more commonly in infants; the virus may go to the brain and cause damage. The general consensus says most people have been infected with an asymptomatic herpes infection at some point in their lives. Statistical studies suggest about 80 percent to 90 percent of the people in the United States have been exposed to HSV-1. The herpes simplex virus affects only humans.


The highly contagious virus is spread when people touch infected saliva or mucous membranes or make skin contact with someone who already has an infection. HSV-1 can also be transmitted by sharing toothbrushes, drinking glasses or eating utensils. When the virus enters the skin or mucous membrane, it starts reproducing. The incubation period for herpes simplex infections is about three to six days. Lesions may appear as either a blister or a cluster of blisters or sores or tiny, shallow, gray ulcers on a red base. Pain, burning, tingling or itching occurs at the infection site before the sores appear. They make it