NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - PEAS

If you were like most kids, you probably turned up your nose at peas when they appeared on your dinner plate – and held your nose as you ate them. Hopefully, you are now mature enough to realize how very good for you peas are, and you no longer leave them to roll around on your plate untouched.


Interestingly enough, pea pods botanically are fruit because they contain seeds and developed from the ovary of a flower. Peas have been around a very long time. They were eaten in ancient India, Egypt and Greece. Back then, they were mostly grown for their dry seeds. Field peas were a staple of the diet during the Middle Ages. Fresh peas were called garden peas. Apparently these were quite the rage in 16th-century France. Today Canada is the world’s largest producer of peas. The work Austrian monk Gregor Johann Mendel did with peas laid the foundation for the modern science of genetics.


We know them mainly as little green balls, but peas are also occasionally yellow and (rarely) purple. They grown in a single row in pods that are about 2 to 3 inches long. Of course we’ve all heard the saying that some people are “as alike as two peas in a pod.”


Green peas are one of the most nutritious vegetables available.

They are full of health-promoting phytonutrients, minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants. Included in these phytonutrients are some recently discovered green pea phytonutrients called saponins. When coupled with the other phytonutrients in green peas, these substances may help lower the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, which is currently becoming epidemic around the world.


Peas are a good source of vitamin C, which is known to help the body build resistance against infectious agents and eliminate harmful, pro- inflammatory free radicals. The abundant vitamin K in peas helps build bone mass. Fresh pea pods are an excellent source of folic acid. Peas are relatively low in calories and contain no cholesterol. They have phytosterols that help lower cholesterol levels. Other beneficial elements in peas include antioxidant flavonoids such as carotenes, lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin A and B-complex vitamins such as pantothenic acid, niacin and thiamin. Peas are rich in essential minerals such as calcium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese. Recent research has shown green peas are a good source of omega-3 fats in the form of alpha- linolenic acid (ALA).


Peas contain high amounts of a polyphenol called coumestrol, which helps fight

stomach cancer. One cup of green peas contains at least 10 milligrams of coumestrol. The only people who would not benefit from including peas in their diets are those who have problems such as a kidney disorder or gout. Peas contain a compound called purines that will adversely people dealing with these health issues. However, if you want to control your weight; strengthen your immune system; prevent wrinkles, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and osteoporosis; promote vision and eye health; regulate blood sugar; reverse insulin resistance; and prevent constipation, please pile peas on your plate.

TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler