NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

….FULL ARTICLE

NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

….FULL ARTICLE

NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Natures Beauty Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE NATURES BEAUTY ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

NATURES BEAUTY - ECHEVERIA

Currently there are about 150 species of Echeveria. They are native from Texas to Central America. Echeverias come from higher altitudes so they like dry air, lots of light, cool night temperatures and good air circulation. Outdoors, they love a spot with all-day sun or a place with morning shade and afternoon sun. Echeveria come in many varieties, colors and textures. Their thick-leaved rosettes are firm to the touch. They have whimsical names such as Lipstick, Fun Queen, Galaxy Blue, Morning Beauty, Topsy Turvy and Mexican Firecracker. The classic types of this succulent are blue-gray or gray-green in color. There are also green, purple and multicolored varieties as well. They make a stunning, intriguing display when grouped together on a windowsill, in a planter or gardenscape. In the summer, some even produce pink, orange or peached-colored flowers.


Echeveria are drought resistant, but they do like to receive regular deep watering and occasional fertilizing. Be sure not to overwater your Echeveria. Soft rots and root rot occur when the plant is too wet. Water the plant from below, not by wetting the leaves of the rosettes. Most will tolerate shade. They thrive in well-lit interiors and grow well in either containers or garden beds. The best way to grow Echeveria in an unglazed clay pot, which allows water to evaporate.

Mulch around it with gravel or sand to help prevent weeds and conserve moisture. Let the soil dry out completely before you water it again. Viva Echeveria!


Sources:


TANYA TYLER





Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

Not everyone has a green thumb. If you are one of those who can barely coax a weed to grow in your garden, perhaps you should investigate the endless possibilities of low- maintenance succulents such as Echeveria. The Echeveria cactus is a rosette-forming succulent plant with foliage that comes in a variety of shapes and colors. Its small triangular leaves grow out from a central point called a rosette (because the leaves give the plant a flower- or rose-like appearance. You may already be familiar with some of these plants, such as hens and chickens, which can take root and take off in many different types of garden venues. Offsets or baby plants nestle against the mother rosette, but these are easy to separate and grow. You can also start new plants from leaf cuttings, according to Gardening Know How. Just lay the leaf on the surface of the soil. It will root within a few weeks, and a small rosette will grow next to the rooted leaf.


Echeveria is named after Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy, an 18th-century Mexican botanical artist and naturalist. He participated in the Royal Botanical Expedition to New Spain in 1787. The expedition sought to compile an inventory of the fauna and flora in New Spain. Echeverria created almost 200 images of different plant species. He was also part of the Guantanamo Commission, which traveled across Cuba and collected 3,700 specimens and found 27 new species. Echeverría later served as an art director at the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico.