NATURES BEAUTY - MISTLETOE

My mother loved decorating for the holidays. From the tree in the den to the lights around all the windows and a big Santa decal on the front door, she was all in. She would also hang a sprig of (fake) mistletoe, complete with sharp-edged leaves and white berries, from the lintel of the doorway between the living room and the kitchen. She and my father always shared the first kiss under the mistletoe after she put it up.

….FULL ARTICLE

NATURES BEAUTY - YLANG YLANG

A new year is the perfect time to try new things. Recently a friend who is into essential oils and aromatherapy told me about ylang ylang. She touted its many benefits – they range from head to toe – and offered to get some for me, but I wanted to do some research on the substance first before committing myself. Ylang ylang is becoming very popular in a wide variety of cosmetic products these days, so perhaps you’d like to learn more about it, too.

….FULL ARTICLE

NATURES BEAUTY - LULO

Continuing our 2018 theme of seeking out new and unusual produce and other types of foods to try, we present to you lulo. Also known as naranjilla, this exotic tropical fruit is a member of the tomato family. It is native to northwestern South America and is found primarily in Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Panama.  The lulo plant is a spreading herbaceous shrub with thick stems. Some of its leaves have spines, but others are spineless.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Natures Beauty Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE NATURES BEAUTY ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

NATURES BEAUTY - BARLEY

Barley is one of the oldest domesticated cereal grains still being grown around the world today. It originated in Ethiopia and southeast Asia. It is most often used in bread and malted beverages such as beer (barley beer was likely one of the first alcoholic drinks humans developed). Over the centuries, barley water has been used for various medicinal purposes; it is good for clearing up urinary tract infections and is also said to be a good remedy for kidney stones. The drink is prepared by mixing barley flour with water. During the Middle Ages, wheat was very expensive and not widely available, so many Europeans of the time made bread from a combination of barley and rye. English and Dutch settlers brought barley to the United States, and this country is a top producer of the grain. In recent years, barley ranked fourth behind corn, rice and wheat in terms of quantity produced.


Barley’s health benefits are hard to beat. According to Medical News Today, barley provides a high percentage of the daily requirement of selenium, which is not found in most foods. Selenium detoxifies cancer-causing compounds, stimulates the production of killer T cells and inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. It also has been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer. Barley has been shown to help lower blood pressure naturally because it contains potassium, calcium and magnesium. Its iron, phosphorous and zinc help build and strengthen bones.

Its folate and vitamin B6 support heart health by preventing the buildup of homocysteine, which can damage blood vessels. Other minerals in barley include manganese and copper. Barley has no cholesterol but it does have plenty of fiber, and that promotes regularity and digestive tract health. That fiber is also high in beta glucan, which lowers cholesterol by binding to bile acids and removing them from the body. And it helps regulate blood sugar levels in people who have diabetes.


Barley is usually available in two forms: hulled and pearled. With hulled barley, the inedible outer shell is removed, leaving the bran and germ intact. If you want to cook with hulled barley, it must be soaked overnight to draw out its flavor and texture, then drained and rinsed. With pearled barley, the layer of bran has been removed along with the hull. Pearl barley is not as chewy as hulled barley and cooks more quickly, but it also has fewer nutrients and is not considered to be whole grain. Whole grains are important sources of dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals. Numerous studies suggest increasing the consumption of plant foods will lower your risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. You can add barley to your diet by using it in soups, stews, salad or bread. Replace your morning

can add barley to your diet by using it in soups, stews, salad or bread. Replace your morning oatmeal with a warm bowl of barley. A study showed barley was much more effective in reducing both glucose and insulin responses than oats. Barley contains gluten, so if you have celiac disease, it is best to avoid eating it.


Sources:


TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler