HOSPITAL-BASED ONCOLOGY MASSAGE

The field of oncology massage has grown leaps and bounds over the past decade. With the increase in evidence-based, peer review research around the efficacy and effectiveness of oncology massage, more and more massage therapists are being trained in this needed and meaningful field. More importantly, more and more cancer patients are receiving the healing power of touch.

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LIVING WITH TMJD

Everyone has a temporomandibular joint (TMJ). It allows you to chew food, talk and open your jaw to sing. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) manifests in many ways, such as pain in the face, ears, neck and shoulder; sinus pain; pain when chewing or talking; jaw clicking or popping; headaches; and locking jaw. Often people suffering with these symptoms develop social and emotional complications as well. Social anxiety can develop from the embarrassment of not being able to properly….

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BECOME A MASSAGE THERAPIST

Over the years many studies have shown a massage has amazing benefits to our overall wellness, such as reduced stress, improved range of motion and reduced pain. However, we rarely have a chance to discuss the benefits of giving a massage. Becoming a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT) is an incredible journey, and often, an incredible career. Learning to become a massage therapist can benefit all age groups and walks of life; such as recent high-school graduates, single parents and even those....

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MORE HOSPITALS ADOPTING MASSAGE THERAPY TO ADDRESS PAIN

Managing pain for patients in an acute care setting can be a tricky situation for hospitals. Medical professionals don’t want to undertreat, inadequately manage or overtreat pain. Any of these options could lead to unpleasant physical and psychological outcomes for patients and their families. And in the face of the nation’s opioid epidemic, hospitals and accreditation organizations across the United States are adopting complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) initiatives such as massage therapy to address pain treatment strategies, according to a study published in the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork.


Study Overview and Results

Conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Ariz., a nonprofit community hospital that serves a large rural area of northern Arizona, researchers provided 53 hospital patients with one or more massage therapy sessions. The sessions averaged 30 minutes each and were administered by three licensed massage therapists employed by the hospital. The most common modalities included gentle Swedish massage, acupressure, craniosacral therapy and cross-fiber myotherapy with light pressure.


The study included patients from medical, surgical and obstetrics units. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a zero to 10 visual analog scale. The findings determined before

massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33.


In the end, qualitative data illustrated improvement in all areas. The most significant areas of impact reported were overall pain level, emotional well-being, relaxation and ability to sleep. This study shows integration of massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient’s ability to deal with the physical and psychological outcomes of his or her health condition, including a significant reduction of pain and an increase in relaxation, sleep and recovery time.


The study report’s primary findings show a strong correlation between reduction of pain levels after massage therapy and statistically significant differences in pain scores before and after massage. The perception among participants of improved pain levels and less need for pain medication underscore the promise of massage therapy’s positive effect on pain management protocols.

Interested in beginning a career in massage?

If you would enjoy a rewarding career bringing the gift of human touch to patients in need, Lexington Healing Arts Academy has just the program for you. We offer 100-hour advanced training in Hospital- Based Massage Therapy (HBMT), the first program of its kind in the state of Kentucky. This unique program encompasses the clinical aspect of working in the hospital setting while providing in-depth guidelines and protocols to safely work on all populations of hospital patients. View information about our full academic program at our Web site, www.lexingtonhealingarts.com.

JEFF ZUTANT

Jeff Zutant is a licensed massage therapist (LMT) and a staff member at Lexington Healing Arts Academy. Beyond his role as massage therapist Jeff coordinates the academy's compliance efforts including student retention and placement.  

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