HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

subscribe to Health & Wellness

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT



  1. Alzheimer’s disease tends to mimic brain diseases that are more common than most people have thought.
  2. Differentiating LATE from Alzheimer’s disease will be a key step toward developing accurate diagnoses and therapies for treating both of these conditions.

MIND MATTERS AND THE LATEST RESEARCH ON ALZHEIMERS DISEASE

Recognizing LATE as a common brain disease will augment dementia research efforts in several ways. It will enable improved Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials and LATE clinical trials through diagnosis and treatment. Learn more about LATE at: www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/20190430/newly-named-late-dementia-mimics-alzheimers#1.


Jicha and Nelson noted with the research gained, they are now testing potential cures using dozens of different medicines. Over the past decade, researchers at the UK Sanders-Brown Center have been able to remove Alzheimer’s disease plaques from donated brains studied at the Center. This has led them to learn that it is not all about Alzheimer’s disease; this is just one form of dementia. It has allowed them to move to the next level by coming closer to preventing Alzheimer’s disease. At this stage of research, they are developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and are focusing on a growing under- standing of LATE. Their target is to cure Alzheimer’s disease, but they are also moving toward a potential cure for LATE.


The lessons learned from the Mind Matters 2020 Summit is very promising for our understanding of where the research is today:



DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

The University of Kentucky recently hosted the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging’s 2020 Mind Matters Health Summit. The summit, which was a videoconference rather than a live event due to COVID-19, was designed to share with the university community and the general public the latest discoveries and new directions the Center is taking in the study of aging.


One of the Center’s foremost studies involved research with the brains of deceased nuns, more commonly known as the Nun Study. This is a population-based cohort of women who have been followed longitudinally for decades, from relatively young age to autopsy. This project began to generate valuable data in the study of Alzheimer’s disease that resulted in identify- ing pathology levels in an aging population.


Dr. Pete Nelson with the UK Department of Pathology and Dr. Greg Jicha with the Department of Neurology summarized the ongoing Alzheimer’s disease research at the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. Among the latest research findings is the presence of what has been called LATE pathology in the aging brain. LATE stands for Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP- 43 Encephalopathy. LATE pathology increases dramatically in advanced aging. Alzheimer’s disease tends to level off and even decrease in advanced old age. LATE affects about one in three persons over age 80 years. It has a large public health impact that is deemed to be on the same order of magnitude as Alzheimer’s disease.