HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

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10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

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FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

….FULL ARTICLE

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and experiences can help your teens know they are not alone. Show love and affection and care for your child. Encourage him to speak about his feelings with you. Deal with problems as they arise, rather than letting them build up. Lastly, be alert and attentive to your teen’s behavior.


Avoid sarcasm, threats, yelling and whining. Speak in a calm voice and be prepared to listen without interrupting your teen. Don’t demean or make personal attacks. If things get too heated, take a break and come back to the discussion later. Remember what it was like to be a teen.


Teens need to know mental health problems can be treated. To find help, they can talk to their school counselor, health care providers and, of course, their parents.

•  does reckless things that could harm you or others;

•  often feels very worried or angry;

•  is aggressive or consistently disobedient or has temper tantrums;

•  thinks someone is controlling their mind;

•  feels grief for a long time after death or a loss;

•  sleeps too much or not at all;

•  is not interested in academics;

•  experiences loss of self-esteem;

•  abandons or loses interest in his or her favorite pastime; or

•  displays excessive isolation and secrecy.


According to research, teens with mental health problems who got appropriate treatment showed an increase in scholastic test scores, and effective mental health interventions and a positive school climate contributed to improved student achievement.


As parents and caretakers, you must communicate constantly with your children by being honest and open about anything and everything. Talking about your fears

Being a teenager is not easy. They are under stress to do well in school, make big decisions, get along with family and friends and be liked. Most of these pressures cannot be avoided, and it is very normal for teens to worry about them. However, feeling persistently hopeless, sad or worthless may be warning signs of a mental health problem.


According to a study by the National Institute of Mental Health, 90 percent of people who develop a mental health problem show warning signs during their teen years. When left untreated, these problems may lead to family conflicts, school failure, trouble with the law, alcohol and drug abuse and even suicide.


Teenagers are known for their sudden shifts in behaviors and moodiness. However, if you notice a significant change in your teen, that can be a danger sign. Some common mental health disorders are depression/ anxiety disorders, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


Help may be required if your teen:

•  uses drugs or alcohol;

•  is obsessed with dieting and/or binge eating and exercising;

•  destroys property or hurt others;

MENTAL HEALTH AND TEENS

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh