HOSPITAL-BASED ONCOLOGY MASSAGE

The field of oncology massage has grown leaps and bounds over the past decade. With the increase in evidence-based, peer review research around the efficacy and effectiveness of oncology massage, more and more massage therapists are being trained in this needed and meaningful field. More importantly, more and more cancer patients are receiving the healing power of touch.

….FULL ARTICLE

LIVING WITH TMJD

Everyone has a temporomandibular joint (TMJ). It allows you to chew food, talk and open your jaw to sing. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) manifests in many ways, such as pain in the face, ears, neck and shoulder; sinus pain; pain when chewing or talking; jaw clicking or popping; headaches; and locking jaw. Often people suffering with these symptoms develop social and emotional complications as well. Social anxiety can develop from the embarrassment of not being able to properly….

….FULL ARTICLE

BECOME A MASSAGE THERAPIST

Over the years many studies have shown a massage has amazing benefits to our overall wellness, such as reduced stress, improved range of motion and reduced pain. However, we rarely have a chance to discuss the benefits of giving a massage. Becoming a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT) is an incredible journey, and often, an incredible career. Learning to become a massage therapist can benefit all age groups and walks of life; such as recent high-school graduates, single parents and even those....

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more articles from our Massage column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE MASSAGE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

MASSAGE CAN HELP ALLEVIATE CHRONIC PAIN

We’ve all had a painful day — a headache that seems to drain us or a toothache that won’t abate until we’ve found ourselves in a dentist’s chair. For most of us, those days are few and far between. With a little time and some over-the-counter medications, we can return to our lives and treat that pain as a bad memory. For 100 million Americans, however, high pain days are a never-ending cycle. These men and women live with chronic pain, an ailment that lasts at least 12 weeks and can be disruptive to their daily lives.*  Chronic pain can result from injury, illness or surgery. And it’s not just physical pain. Neurological changes from pain as well as changes to daily routines can lead a long-term pain sufferer to experience depression and anxiety.**


While chronic pain can be debilitating, there are methods of pain reduction that can be quite beneficial. Medications and surgeries can alleviate some pain symptoms. In addition, massage has been shown to be very helpful in lowering both acute and chronic pain.***  Massage helps relax muscle tension and ease the nervous system. In addition, massage has been shown to be effective in alleviating depression and anxiety, two of the hallmark ailments that usually occur with long-term chronic pain.****


Lower back pain, which is chief among chronic pain complaints, tends to respond extremely well to massage interventions. In a 2017 update to its treatment guide, the American College of Physicians declared

massage and exercise were more effective and safer in treating non-radiating back pain than medication.*****


When it comes to making massage part of your pain management program, there are many factors to consider. There are many different types of massage and body work, all of which can be beneficial in alleviating pain. Swedish massage, one of the most common forms of body work, uses long gliding strokes to reduce muscular tension and induce a relaxed state. The therapist can adjust the pressure to meet the client’s needs. Deep tissue, another popular form of massage, works slower and deeper in the belly of the muscles to reduce tension in deeper structures. Deep tissue is favored by many therapists working with a post-injury client. While the bodywork does occur deeper in the body, it does not rely exclusively on pressure and it does not have to be painful.


In some instances, a chronic pain client and the therapist might agree a full body massage is not the most effective use of time. Instead, the massage therapist might work with a group of muscles affected by injury or pain. In that case, a one-hour session may not be necessary.


Massage has a long history of pain reduction. It is always a good idea to talk to your doctor about adding it to your pre-existing pain reduction plan, but massage is considered generally safe. If you have questions regarding how massage might help you, call the Lexington Healing Arts Academy’s massage clinic at (859) 252-5656. With nearly 20 years of history in the Lexington community, LHAA is always ready to help match you with the right therapist.


Sources:


* www.thegoodbody.com/chronic-pain-statistics/

** www.psycom.net/depression.central.chronic.pain.html

*** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1876616/

**** www.amtamassage.org/approved_position_statements/Massage-Can-Reduce-Symptoms-of-Depression.html

***** www.acponline.org/acp-newsroom/american-college-of-physicians-issues-guideline-for-treating-nonradicular-low-back-pain

JEFF ZUTANT

Jeff Zutant is a licensed massage therapist (LMT) and a staff member at Lexington Healing Arts Academy. Beyond his role as massage therapist Jeff coordinates the academy's compliance efforts including student retention and placement.  

more articles by Jeff Zutant