STAYING FIT AND HEALTHY DURING THE HOLIDAYS

With the holidays coming up, the highlight for many people during this season is gathering with family and friends and enjoying favorite holiday treats. Here are some tips that will help you enjoy your holidays to the fullest while not increasing your waistline.

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MAKING AND KEEPING NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

Only 8 percent of individuals achieved their resolutions in 2016, according to Statistic Brain. This is likely due to most people having unrealistic expectations about the speed, ease and consequences of the resolutions they make. People attempting self-change rarely succeed the first time; most need five or six attempts, according to a paper published in American Psychologist by Janet Polivy and Peter Herman. The authors suggest false hope syndrome is the cause for failure.

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HEALTHY HOLIDAY OPTIONS

The holidays are a wonderful time to gather with family and friends to celebrate. These celebrations often consist of many delicious treats and hardy meals. You can still maintain a healthy diet with a little thought and planning in advance. Research from a recent Web-based survey found 18 percent of people feel they cannot eat healthily during the holidays because they don’t want to miss out on their favorite foods. You can still eat the foods you enjoy this season, just in moderation.

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what you do. Self-trust can only develop from success, so don’t challenge yourself with anything you’re not sure you can handle, says Joseph J. Luciani, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist who writes a series of self-coaching books. Reward yourself whenever a sub-goal is achieved. Expect old habits to emerge from time to time, but treat them as temporary setbacks rather than total failure and a reason to give up.


Don’t wait until New Year’s Eve to choose a resolution. Life changes of habits and attitudes are not as blithe as which shirt to don. Be patient with yourself. Lasting change takes time.

MAKING AND KEEPING NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

This emotional friction, if not faced, can result in giving up. This is where self-discipline comes in. It is not something people are born with; it must be developed like a muscle. Self-discipline is acquired by willfully enduring the transient discomfort of changing who and what you are.


It’s advised to make only one resolution because the chances of success are greater when we channel energy into changing just one aspect of our behavior. Try thinking of it as more of a goal and take a look at the habits that are holding you back from what you want out of your life. Make the goal specific. Rather than “get into shape,” determine what that actually means for you: a certain weight, a body-fat percentage, to run three miles or do 10 pull-ups, a change in eating habits or more exercise. Break this goal into a series of steps, focusing on creating sub-goals that are concrete, measureable and time-based. Think small and begin with small successes, such as taking a 20-minute walk after dinner.


Make a firm promise to yourself that there is no excuse to not accomplish the task to enable change. Find simple challenges and make them happen. As you continue this practice, it will build self-trust. Accept what you say to yourself is

Only 8 percent of individuals achieved their resolutions in 2016, according to Statistic Brain. This is likely due to most people having unrealistic expectations about the speed, ease and consequences of the resolutions they make. People attempting self-change rarely succeed the first time; most need five or six attempts, according to a paper published in American Psychologist by Janet Polivy and Peter Herman. The authors suggest false hope syndrome is the cause for failure.


“Deciding to change produces reinforcing feelings of being in control, and the self-change effort begins well, generally with success in the early stages,” they wrote. “As time goes by and the endeavor continues, change becomes more difficult to sustain and ultimately no further progress is made and backsliding may begin. One or more relapse episodes results in abandonment of the effort, which now is deemed a failure.” This causes the individual to feel worse than before the resolution. But why does failure seem inevitable?


Outside-in solutions rarely work and are doomed to fail, compared to resolves to change. Internal change drives outward change. Enhancing the capacity to sustain motivation or handle the inevitable stress and discomfort that come with change will serve one more than dieting or joining a gym. All change is accompanied by some degree of emotional friction, which can be experienced as stress, anxiety, depression, frus- tration, fatigue, feeling weak and out of control or boredom.