SENIORS AND RESISTANCE TRAINING: A MUST FOR HEALTH AND LONGEVITY

What population does weight lifting and resistance training benefit most? While these activities are important for youth athletes, business professionals, stay at home moms, and middle aged men alike, they are imperative for seniors! Many of the "age related" issues that the senior demographic seems chronically plagued by including but not limited to arthritis, bone breakage, balance issues, heart disease, diabetes, poor circulation and obesity, can be prevented and even alleviated by introducing a resistance training program.

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THE 4 MOST UNDERRATED EXERCISES YOU SHOULD BE DOING

As a fitness professional in a commercial gym I've seen most of the exercises you could ever imagine. With the wide world of exercise selection floating around the air in the gym as well as on the Internet, it can be over whelming choosing which exercises your should into your personal program. In this article, I have compiled a list of exercises that are underrated and underused. Read on to find out which exercises you may have been skipping over that you should start adding into your routine!

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MAKE A VOW TO LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE AND REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE

February is American Heart Month and as a leading community-based network committed to improving the nation’s health, the YMCA of Central Kentucky urges everyone to help prevent heart disease by lowering your blood pressure. Two ways to keep the pressure off your heart are by monitoring your blood pressure and reducing sodium intake.

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MAKE A VOW TO LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE AND REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE

February is American Heart Month and as a leading community-based network committed to improving the nation’s health, the YMCA of Central Kentucky urges everyone to help prevent heart disease by lowering your blood pressure. Two ways to keep the pressure off your heart are by monitoring your blood pressure and reducing sodium intake.


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease is the nation’s number one killer, responsible for 1 in 4 deaths each year in the United States. Additionally, 1 in 3 adults has high blood pressure with less than half having it under control. High blood pressure is most prevalent in minority communities, and is often referred to as “The Silent Killer” because there are typically no warning signs or symptoms.


To address the prevalence of heart disease, the Y has made a national commitment to the Million Hearts campaign, an initiative spearheaded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that aims to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes. As part of this commitment, the YMCA of Central Kentucky encourages heart health through the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program.


The YMCA of Central Kentucky is increasing the availability of the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program – which is part of the CDC-led   

National Diabetes Prevention Program. The YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program helps adults at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles to help reduce their chances of developing the disease. Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and people with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke as those who do not have it.


The program provides a supportive environment where participants work together in a small group to learn about eating healthier, increasing their physical activity and making other behavior changes with the goal of reducing body weight by 7 percent in order to reduce their risk for developing diabetes. A trained lifestyle coach leads the program over a 12-month period beginning with 16 weekly sessions followed by bi-weekly, then monthly maintenance sessions. Increased physical activity and moderate weight loss not only reduce diabetes risk, but also have an impact on lowering blood pressure and cholesterol.


Participants in the program receive a free membership to the YMCA for themselves and their entire family during the first 16 weeks of the program.

Program Qualifications


•  At least 18 years old, overweight (BMI > 25)*, and

•  At risk for developing  type 2 diabetes or

•  Diagnosed with prediabetes**

•  *Asian individual(s) BMI >22

•  **Individuals who have already been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes do not qualify for this program


To see if you qualify or for information about program fees and financial assistance, contact:

•  Director of Community Health

•  Corey Donohoo

•  Email communityhealth@ymcacky.org or call 859-367-7317.


Besides monitoring your blood pressure, reducing sodium intake is a great way to keep your heart healthy. According to the American Heart Association, too much sodium in your system puts an extra burden on your heart and blood vessels. In some people, this may lead to or raise high blood pressure. Everyone, including kids, should reduce their sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day (about 1 teaspoon of salt). Having less sodium in your diet may help you lower or avoid high blood pressure.


“There are many factors in keeping your heart healthy and having a handle on your blood pressure is an effective tool in the preventing heart disease,” said YMCA of Central Kentucky’s Director of Community Health, Corey Donohoo. “Whether you have high blood pressure or are at risk for heart disease, the Y has many options available that can help.


” In addition to programs and services offered in Central Kentucky, the Y offers the following tips from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help reduce sodium in your diet.  


1. Think fresh: Most of the sodium Americans eat is found in processed foods. Eat highly processed foods less often and in smaller portions - especially cheesy foods, such as pizza; cured meats, such as bacon, sausage, hot dogs, and deli/luncheon meats; and ready-to-eat foods, like canned chili, ravioli and soups. Fresh foods are generally lower in sodium.


2. Enjoy home-prepared foods: Cook more often at home - where you are in control of what’s in your food. Preparing your own foods allows you to limit the amount of salt in them.


3. Fill up on veggies and fruits - they are naturally low in sodium: Eat plenty of vegetables and fruits - fresh or frozen. Eat a vegetable or fruit at every meal.


4. Adjust your taste buds:  Cut back on salt little by little - and pay attention to the natural tastes of various foods. Your taste for salt will lessen over time. Additionally, keep salt off the kitchen counter and the dinner table and substitute spices, herbs, garlic, vinegar or lemon juice to season foods.


5. Boost your potassium intake: Choose foods with potassium, which may help to lower your blood pressure. Potassium is found in vegetables and fruits, such as potatoes, beet greens, tomato juice and sauce, sweet potatoes, beans (white, lima, kidney), and bananas. Other sources of potassium include yogurt, clams, halibut, orange juice and milk.

THE YMCA OF CENTRAL KENTUCKY

The YMCA of Central Kentucky offers a community of diverse individuals who can support all people in meeting their health and well-being goals. Learn more by visiting ymcacky.org or stopping into your local Y.  

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