IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

….FULL ARTICLE

DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

….FULL ARTICLE

SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

prepare? Did the counseling session with the couple in a troubled marriage make any difference? Then there is the friend who shows up for lengthy visits to his office on busy weekdays because, as the friend says, “You only work one day a week, Sunday mornings.” Diddle thinks man really believes it.


How does he know when the stress is getting to him? “Your spouse lets you know,” Diddle said. “You come home a bit withdrawn, feeling depressed.” Diddle says his wife, Annette, is completely trustworthy. He can unload his frustrations to her, knowing nothing he says will be repeated to anyone. “There are no secrets between us,” he said. This opportunity to be forthright and honest out loud to someone else carries him through, Diddle said. He also relies on the same source of strength Brabon described: prayer.

David Brabon is a plastic surgeon. In his practice at Rockcastle Hospital and Respiratory Center in Mount Vernon, Ky. – the largest respiratory care center in the United States – he removes skin cancers from faces and hands and rebuilds shattered noses, among other tasks. He has learned to not only encourage others but to maintain his own mental well-being.


A self-described man of faith, Brabon says he often lies in bed at night thinking of the patients he has operated on that day. He has two choices, he says: “You can either worry or you can pray.” He chooses the latter. He prays for guidance for himself. He prays for his patients; he also prays with them if they want him to. Brabon said research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates if a medical provider does not offer spiritual help to a patient, it is almost negligence. He does not press the issue if patients don’t want him to pray.


Brabon recalls finding out firsthand how stressful medical work can be. He remembers when he was a junior resident, just graduated from the University of Louisville’s medical school, breaking down while talking with his superior, the assistant director of emergency medicine at Detroit General Hospital. The patient load was just tremendous, he says. Eleven victims with gunshot wounds had come in all at one time that day.



MAINTAINING MENTAL WELL-BEING IN STRESSFUL JOBS

MARTHA EVANS SPARKS

Martha Evans Sparks is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by martha evans sparks

“I have all these patients,” he wailed to the assistant director, “and they expect us to know everything about everyone. It is just too much.” The director, Brabon says, was gentle and kind. “The whole staff just encouraged me after that.”


Another group of professionals who not only see (and listen to) others’ mental problems and may experience stress in their own work is pastors. Denominational differences in theology do not matter; all pastors face similar onslaughts on their own mental health. Just ask Rev. Daryl Diddle, senior pastor of the Wilmore Free Methodist Church, a thriving congregation where about 600 persons attend worship services most Sundays.


“There is a vast difference in working with volunteers and with paid employees,” said Diddle. While most churches have a small paid staff, the majority of the work is done by unpaid volunteers. “Are you going to criticize their work or tell these people to stop whatever they are doing that is counterproductive and driving you crazy? They can go away any time they want to,” Diddle said with a smile.


The deepest stress he experiences, Diddle says, is never knowing whether he is accomplishing anything. Is anyone listening to the sermons he works so hard to