AUDIBEL PROMOTES HEARING HEALTH

According to hearing health providers, nearly one in five Americans age 12 years and older – 48 million people – experience hearing loss severe enough to hinder communication. Hearing loss is the third most prevalent age-related disability in adults age 75 years plus, following arthritis and hypertension. Only 5 percent of hearing loss in adults can be improved medically or surgically. The vast majority of Americans with hearing loss are treated with hearing aids.

….FULL ARTICLE

TAKING CARE OF YOUR AGING SKIN

As you age, you may notice wrinkles and brown spots on your skin. Aging makes skin more prone to dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it less plump and smooth. Cuts and bruises might take longer to heal. How skin ages will depend on several factors: your heredity, lifestyle, diet and other personal habits, such as smoking. Sunlight is another major cause of skin aging.

….FULL ARTICLE

A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP IS GOOD FOR SENIOR HEALTH

For some seniors,getting a good night’s sleep is an everyday challenge. Some sleep specialists recommend seniors sleep about seven and a half hours on average, while others say seniors need to get as much sleep as they always have to function at their best. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) convened experts from the fields of sleep research, anatomy and physiology as well as pediatrics, neurology and gerontology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

As we age, gradients of satisfaction with one’s body image may change. These can be part of the reasons individuals seek cosmetic surgery. From a mental health perspective, this may lead to body dysmorphic disorder, a condition that may be characterized by an individual’s intense preoccupation with an imagined defect in his or her appearance. If a physical anomaly is actually present, the individual’s preoccupation with it may be markedly excessive. An individual with this condition may experience significant distress and/ or functional impairment. If this occurs, it should be discussed with the primary care physician with possible referral for a psychiatric consultation. Read more about this condition and cosmetic surgery at: https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-body-dysmorphic-disorder#1.


Sources and Resources


LIKING WHO YOU ARE

emotions, moods, experiences, parental attitudes and more. It strongly influences our self-understanding of ourselves and how we behave. Preoccupation with and distortions of body image are said to be widespread among American women. These are driving forces in some psychiatric ailments, including anxiety, depression and eating disorders.


The nature and accuracy of one’s perception of real and ideal bodily attributes determine the strategies to fill this gap. Body satisfaction refers to the degree to which one is satisfied with one’s present body attributes. The level of body satisfaction determines the degree of one’s confidence, self-esteem and body dissatisfaction. Because of significant consequences of body perception and body satisfaction, there has been an upsurge in the efforts of researchers worldwide to uncover the intricacies involved in individuals’ body perceptions and satisfaction. When puberty causes emotional and physical changes, some adolescents become unhappy with or self-conscious about various aspects of their appearance. Peers and media often play a key role for young teens with respect to the idea of the “perfect body.”

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller

Liking who you are is a critical factor in self-esteem growth and development. Body image is a contributing aspect to understanding yourself. The term body image was first attributed to Austrian neurologist and psychoanalyst Dr. Paul Schilderin. He wrote the book The Image and Appearance of the Human Body (1935). Society has always placed great worth on the beauty of the human body. Human beings’ perceptions of their own bodies differ when their perceptions do not fit societal standards and expectations. Knowledge about the facts and dynamics of their personal attributes may significantly affect individuals’ psychological functioning and personal well-being.


The process of self-perception of one’s traits, attributes, body image and abilities is complex and unique for each individual. The concept of body image refers to the extent to which a person perceives facts pertaining to his or her body accurately. This perception may result either in satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Body perception involves subjective knowledge of your physical attributes and how these attributes contribute to your feelings of self-worth.


Among the critical questions in understanding body image is how a person perceives herself in the social and interpersonal realm. Body image is the mental representation you create yourself, but it may or may not bear close relation to how others actually see you. Body image is subject to all kinds of distortion from internal elements such as