HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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I designed a T-shirt and a pamphlet that has been circulated to several hundred people. I traveled to Washington, D.C., to the 10th annual Advocacy Summit of the Lung Cancer Alliance to vocalize on behalf of lung cancer detection in non-smokers. I have started a Breath of Hope KY Facebook page to post information about the disease. I have worked with KORT Physical Therapy to spread awareness about a little-known cancer rehab program and other opportunities most cancer patients do not realize are available to them post surgery. Through the American Lung Cancer Association of Kentucky, two women interested in learning how my advocacy can potentially fall in line with their Lung Force program contacted me. I think raising money for a cause is great, but when you raise awareness, you are creating a priceless opportunity to save lives though increased knowledge about the disease.


I am currently gearing up for Lung Cancer Awareness Month in November and already have several businesses stepping up to join my campaign, “Erase the Sigma … Silence the Myth.” I will work to spread awareness about lung cancer in non-smokers. ABC has already booked me for a segment on Nov. 12 to support my efforts. I will do all I can to help prevent any other family from being blindsided as I was simply because no one has yet stepped up to become a new face of lung cancer.

I was born and raised in Lexington, Ky. I am a 53-year-old, healthy non-smoker who never thought she would get lung cancer. About this time last year, I probably knew as much about lung cancer as the majority of Kentuckians do. If you smoke, you have a greater chance of developing lung cancer; therefore, if you don’t smoke, why worry, right?


Wrong!


Not only does Kentucky lead the nation in lung cancer cases and deaths, lung cancer kills more men and women than any other cancer – and nearly 20 percent of lung cancer patients have never smoked.


My lung cancer was found by coincidence when my primary care physician saw a shadow on a routine X-ray. She sent me for a CT scan that revealed a 1.2-cm nodule and then she referred me to a pulmonologist. Non-smokers do not qualify for lung cancer pre-screening, so had it not been for this unrelated chest X-ray, my lung cancer would only have been discovered in the late stages – after it had spread.


For a year and a half, a series of scans were done to watch for growth, but at no time was the nodule ever perceived as lung cancer. After the nodule ultimately doubled in size, it was determined through a second opinion that surgery should be scheduled to remove the “foreign growth.” During surgery, the doctors discovered the nodule was, in fact, cancer. I, a healthy non-smoker, had lung cancer.  

KENTUCKY NEEDS A BREATH OF HOPE

LINDI CAMPBELL


more articles by Lindi Campbell

I have since learned almost every non-smoker tends to find their lung cancer in later stages because the disease has so few early symptoms, and the symptoms that do become visible often go misdiagnosed. The cancer is already in Stage 4 by the time it is discovered. Fortunately, my cancer was found and removed before it reached the lymph nodes. Two lobes of my lower right lung were removed (about 35 percent) to ensure all the cancer was gone.


My shocking diagnosis, recovery issues and further understanding of the information I read about this horrible disease left me with no other option but to leap into action. I could not sit around just being thankful I had narrowly escaped a terminal diagnosis. I owed it to all the men and women non-smokers who were not as fortunate as I was to do all I could to educate others and spread awareness. Shortly after I recovered from my surgery, I began numerous advocacy efforts to erase the stigma of lung cancer. Early detection is the only way this disease will ever be caught in time to save lives. Without a greater awareness that non-smokers can get lung cancer too, it will continue to be stigmatized as a smokers-only cancer.