VIGILANCE FOR BRAIN CANCER

Brain cancer is a very serious form of cancer. Recently, Sen. John McCain revealed he has been diagnosed with a primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – the most aggressive type of brain tumor. GBMs originate in the brain; it does not spread there from another part of the body. The cause is not known. This tumor has no relation to melanoma, the skin cancer for which McCain was treated in the past.

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QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY

Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for cancer. It kills healthy cells along with cancer cells, inflicting damage on the body and seriously compromising the immune system. Chemotherapy also kills most rapidly dividing healthy and cancer cells, but not all the cells are fast growing. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cancer cells that are slow growing and thus resistant to treatment, do not die. Chemotherapy makes these cells even more numerous as the ratio of highly malignant cells….

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RESTORING DIGNITY AND ’DOS

For many women facing cancer, the most devastating aspect is learning they may lose their hair due to chemotherapy.  “Most women tell me that as soon as they hear the oncologist say, ‘You’re going to lose your hair,’ that’s the last thing they remember hearing,” said Eric Johnson, co-owner, with his wife, Jeletta, of Hair Institute in Lexington. “They can deal with the sickness; they can deal with the treatments; but it’s the hair loss that gets them the most.

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IT PAYS TO KNOW PROSTATE CANCER SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

grown large enough to put pressure on the urethra or the tumor grows into surrounding tissues and organs. Because of the proximity of the prostate gland in relation to the bladder and urethra, prostate cancer may be accompanied by a variety of urinary symptoms. Depending on its size and location, a tumor may be pressing on and constricting the urethra, inhibiting the urine flow. Some prostate cancer signs related to urination include trouble starting or difficulty urinating; stopping while urinating; pain or burning during urination; frequent urge to urinate at night; blood in the urine (hematuria); loss of bladder control; and decreased flow or velocity of the urine stream.


Other symptoms include painful ejaculation; blood in the semen; erectile dysfunction; swelling in the legs or pelvic area; and bone pain that doesn’t go away. Late signs and symptoms of prostate cancer, which occur as the cancer grows or spreads to other parts of the body, include weight loss, fatigue, nausea or vomiting and anemia.


To diagnose prostate cancer, your doctor may do a digital rectal exam (DRE) to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. Blood tests for prostate specific

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that is part of the male reproductive system. It is located beneath the bladder and in front of the rectum. Male hormones called androgens stimulate the activity and growth of the prostate.


Many men’s prostates get larger as they grow older due to a non-cancerous condition called prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy (besides skin cancer) diagnosed in men. Nearly 1.1 million men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year around the world. It affects one in seven men in America.


The risk factors for prostate cancer include being over 65 years old – the older a man gets, the more likely he will develop prostate cancer. Your risk of prostate cancer is higher if you have a family history of it. Prostate cancer is more common among African-American men as compared to Asian/ Pacific Islanders and Native American and Native Alaskan men.


The American Cancer Society recommends men make an informed decision with their doctors about whether to be tested for prostate cancer beginning at age 50 years. Prostate cancer may not cause any signs or symptoms in its early stages because it is a slow-growing cancer. The symptoms do not appear until the cancer has

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

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antigens (PSA) are also used in prostate cancer screening. Treatment depends on the stage of the cancer and how fast it grows. Options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy.


To reduce your risk of prostate cancer, try eating soy products such as soy beans and tofu; tomatoes and food containing tomato sauce; vegetables such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli; fish such as salmon and sardines; walnuts; and flaxseed. Leading a healthy lifestyle can also help you reduce your risk.


Sources and Resources


•  American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org)

•  Cancer Treatment Centers of America (www.cancercenter.com)

•  MedLine Plus (www.medlineplus.gov)

•  Prostate Cancer Treatment Research Foundation (www.pctrf.org)