HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Weigh yourself before and after exercise to see how much you’ve lost through perspiration. The rule of thumb is to drink a pint of water for every pound of sweat you lose.

HYDRATE! HYDRATE! HYDRATE!

Staying hydrated helps prevent a decline in performance (strength, power, aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity) during exercise. Keeping your body hydrated helps the heart more easily pump blood through the blood vessels to the muscles, thus enabling the muscles to work more efficiently. While drinking lots of water is good, too much water can lead to hyponatremia, when excess water in the body dilutes the sodium content of the blood.


How can you tell you’re dehydrated? If you feel thirsty, you are already getting dehydrated. So you shouldn’t wait until you feel thirsty before you start drinking. Dehydration can be a serious condition that can lead to problems ranging from swollen feet or a headache to life-threatening illnesses such as heat stroke. Your urine is a good indication of whether you’re hydrated or not. Pale, clear urine means you’re well hydrated. Dark urine means you need to drink more fluids – specifically water. The pinch test is another easy way to check your hydration level. Pinch the skin on the back of your hand and hold it for a few seconds. If the skin takes a while to return to its normal position when you let go, you may be dehydrated. Feeling dizzy or lightheaded is another sign of dehydration. Stop and rest if you encounter this symptom.

One of the most important things you should do before, during and after exercising is to hydrate. Drinking water – whether you’re working out in the heat of summer or cool of winter – helps keep your muscles working. It helps you avoid fatigue and prolongs endurance. It helps replace the fluid you lose as sweat when you exercise. Staying hydrated will help you maintain your body temperature and keep you from overheating.


A good rule of thumb is to drink about 2 cups of fluid before starting an activity, whether it’s walking, running, biking or tennis – indoors or outside. While participating in your exercise session, try to drink four to six ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes. Find a water bottle you like. Fill it up at the beginning of your day and drink from it regularly. If you don’t like the non-taste of water, infuse it with slices of fruit (lime, lemon, orange) or a sprig of mint.


Water is the best beverage for hydration. However, if you sweat a lot or if you participate in longer, more intense periods of exertion such as marathon training, you may want to drink a sports drink such as Gatorade or Powerade to replace the electrolytes and other minerals you lose when you sweat. Sports drinks are designed to rapidly replace fluids and increase the sugar (glucose) circulating in your blood for an energy boost. Carbonated drinks (sodas) are not good choices because they often contain caffeine, which acts as a diuretic and causes you to lose more fluids. These types of drinks can also cause stomach cramps. Besides, you don’t need the extra (empty) calories unless you’re trying to gain weight.