THERMOGRAPHY: FUNCTIONAL VS. STRUCTURAL IMAGING

Many people are familiar with structural imaging such as ultrasounds, X-rays and mammograms. However, they aren’t as familiar with the thermography option. Thermography is a totally non-invasive option for breast and body screenings. It has been FDA approved since 1984 and is used as an adjunct to mammography for breast screenings.  This rapidly developing technology is used to detect and locate thermal abnormalities characterized by an increase or decrease found at....

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THE SHERLOCK HOLMES OF HEALTHCARE: ULTRASOUNDS AND THERMOGRAPHY

Ultrasound imaging and thermography are important aspects in healthcare – they definitely cover more than babies. Many diagnoses and treatment plans stem from ultrasound and thermography procedures.  Ultrasounds are used to see internal body structures, such as tendons, muscles, joints, blood vessels and internal organs to find the source of a disease. Ultrasound works by using sound waves with frequencies that are higher than those audible to humans.

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SLEEP APNEA CAN BE A SYMPTOM OF SOMETHING MORE SERIOUS

Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography is now offering home sleep study kits. You may be asking yourself why a diagnostic imaging center is introducing sleep testing. The human body is kind of like the old children’s rhyme: “The knee bone is connected to the thigh bone.” There’s more of a correlation than one may think.

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HEALTHCARE: HOW'D WE GET HERE AND WHERE DO WE GO?

As I’m writing this article, the elections are here and, as usual, the opinions, complaints, fears and concerns about healthcare are as diverse as the potential medical conditions there are to acquire.


By the time this article is printed, the elections will be decided – but chances are great the healthcare crisis will continue. In fact, this concern is more than a century old.


Theodore Roosevelt unsuccessfully attempted to introduce universal healthcare in 1912. By 1929, Baylor University introduced an idea that became the birth of modern healthcare – a 50-cent-per-month plan to ensure payment in the event of hospitalization. This was Blue Cross insurance.


After this introduction, the Great Depression hit and few Americans could afford such a luxury when food and shelter were barely obtainable. Employers began to offer free health insurance to attract employees during World War II. The war imposed a wage freeze and this was a way for employers to compete for better candidates. By 1943, employer-paid health insurance was expected, thanks to the IRS declaring it tax free.


Presidents Truman, Kennedy, Reagan, Nixon and Clinton all attempted to take on health insurance in a national forum, only to learn

health insurance had long become big business. President Barak Obama brought us the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, the first national healthcare expansion in decades, but it continues to face fierce opposition from the health insurance industry.


Since the implementation of the ACA, 250,000 previously uninsured Kentuckians now have insurance. Sounds great – but there’s more to the story. In order to be ACA-compliant, and quite frankly to have any health insurance at all, many of us were faced with choosing high-deductible plans. I would love to say this keeps the premiums reasonable, but that is definitely subjective! The most used private insurance company in Kentucky has rates of $306.67 for male employees and $738.55 for female employees per month with the lowest deductible of $2,500 per individual. The prices quoted are for those 25 years old and younger. For an employee who is 50 to 65 years old, the premiums are $1,023.13 to $1,041.88. That’s more than $12,000 a year. Is your head spinning yet? Well, you can wait until the politicians solve this for you, but their track record doesn’t make them a good bet.

Central Kentuckians have a choice. Some healthcare providers are thinking outside the box. Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography decided to do just that. By being transparent and all-inclusive in our pricing, PCU offers nationally certified sonographers to perform diagnostic ultrasounds at a fraction of the cost of insurance-dependent facilities. Patient Choice recognized even with the high-deductible plan, many patients were still underserved due to the high cost of exams and having to pay out of pocket. The lack of transparency of the actual costs complicates it even more for the patient.


Patient Choice believes firmly that everyone should have catastrophic insurance. Serious illnesses, accidents and life-altering diseases are expensive and should not devastate all aspects of your life due to financial ruin. Companies such as Medvoucher and Access Med are other alternatives to the standard insurance model.


Take action for more control of your healthcare.


KIM DAVIES, RDMS, RDCS, RVS

With 40 years in the field of ultrasound, Kim Davis, RDMS, RDCS, RVS, is the founder and CEO of PCU, 152 W. Tiverton Way in Lexington. PCU can be reached at 859-554-7360 or at www.patientchoiceultrasound.com.

more articles by Kim Davis