HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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HOW TO DEAL WITH EXERCISE ACHES & PAINS

After you have fully recovered from your injury, you can pick your workout schedule back up, but you shouldn’t return to the level of intensity you were at before the injury occurred. You will need to work back up to that level gradually. If you push too hard and too fast, you may injure yourself again and have to start from square one.


It may be helpful to consult with a fitness trainer to help you design a workout specifically for you and your goals, whether that is to lose weight, run a marathon or just improve your overall health and wellness. The trainer will also show your proper form to optimize your workout. Some exercise injuries happen because people don’t know the proper way to use weights or other equipment, or they wear the wrong gear.


Be sure to check with your primary care physician before starting an exercise program. Start slowly and gradually, steadily building up the intensity, duration and frequency of your exercise regimen. Vary your exercises to prevent repetitive- use injuries such as shin splints. For instance, you may run one day and lift weights another day. Incorporate a day or two of rest into your program as well to give your body a chance to recover between workouts.

Injuries can happen to anyone, whether you’re a professional athlete or a weekend warrior. Some common workout injuries include bruises, muscle pulls and sprains. Because of its complex structure and weight-bearing capacity, the knee is the most commonly injured joint. Signs of a sports injury include tenderness, inflammation or swelling. Fortunately, most sports injuries are minor and can be self-treated at home.


You can lower your risk of getting injured by taking some simple precautions before and after your workout. Warm up before you start each session by doing some easy dynamic stretches or jogging in place. You could also jump rope or ride an exercise bike before hitting the road if you’re going for a run. This will loosen up your muscles, joints and ligaments and help increase your heart rate gradually. At the end of your workout, be sure to cool down and bring your heart rate back to normal. Walk and stretch for five to 10 minutes when you’re done – never just stop abruptly. Be sure to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water before, during and after your exercise session.


If you do get hurt, remember RICE: rest, ice, compress, elevate. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen can help ease pain and inflammation. Until you are fully healed, don’t do the activity that triggered the injury. If the injury does not improve within a week or gets worse, seek medical care. You should call a health professional right away if the injury causes severe pain or if you can’t place weight on the leg or foot.