HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Your dietary protein needs may vary throughout your lifetime. For most people, it’s unnecessary to be hyper-focused on calculat- ing exact protein needs. Focusing on building a plate at each meal that incorporates at least one protein-rich food can help you meet your protein needs and keep you feeling full and satisfied until your next meal.   


Resources:


HOW MUCH PROTEIN IS ENOUGH?


A different and often simpler way to estimate protein needs is to use the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) of 10 percent to 35 percent of total calories. This would mean an individual eating 2,000 calories per day should eat anywhere from 50 to 175 grams of protein per day. This is a wide range, but many people find it easy to aim for eating a level of protein somewhere in the middle of the AMDR. A helpful guide for most people is to aim to get around 20 to 30 grams of protein at breakfast, lunch and dinner. For example, a meal of 4 ounces of grilled chicken, half a cup of cooked brown rice and 1 cup of steamed broccoli contains around 30 grams of protein. Besides lean meats, other high-protein foods include dairy products, eggs, tofu, beans, nuts and seeds. Fortunately, eating a sufficient amount of protein in your daily diet can be accomplished no matter your dietary preferences or restrictions.


Some research linked increased protein intake with weight loss. A 2015 review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported moderately high protein diets – 1.2 to 1.6 grams of protein per kilo- gram of body weight – support weight loss while preserving muscle mass. This is partly due to protein’s ability to curb hunger and keep you feeling full longer.

“Protein” has become a buzzword, but it is a key component to health. Protein is one of three major macronutrients, along with carbohydrates and fats. It contains four calories per gram. Protein is made up of amino acids, which form the basic structure of many physical and chemical components of the human body. This is why protein is often called the “building blocks” of the body. When you add protein to your diet, you provide the amino acids necessary for replenishing cells, tissues, bones, muscles, etc. It is critical to eat adequate amounts of protein to support overall health.


Nutrition recommendations are developed by federal agencies that compile and analyze nutrition research. These agencies reach conclusions that serve the general public. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein for adults is 0.8 g/kg per day (Institute of Medicine, 2005). This means an adult weighing 150 lbs (68 kg) will require 54g of protein per day to prevent deficiency. This amount represents a baseline level for intake and does not necessarily mean this is the optimal level of protein for all individuals. There are several situations when additional protein may be needed and should be prioritized, for example for: