HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT


Another condition often affecting the heart is stress. This factor is commonly reported as the No. 1 trigger for a heart attack. Stress may be lessened or managed by knowing how to deal with it. Taking a stress management course may be helpful. This will help you learn ways to handle your anger. Having a wide circle of supportive friends and getting sufficient exercise may contribute to staying calm and in charge of your health.


A healthy lifestyle is necessary for leading a good life. Research shows a person may lower their susceptibility to heart disease by as much as 82 percent simply by adopting a sensible health plan. So don’t delay. If you have no plan for healthy living or if you have gotten off track, commit today. Eat well, exercise often, watch your weight, learn to deal with stress and pay attention to your numbers.

Heart disease won’t happen to you, right? Think again. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women. Heart disease is prevalent at midlife as well as old age. Each year, 500,000 Americans die from this condition, and half of those affected are women.


What is heart disease? Coronary heart disease happens when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened, brittle and narrowed with a build-up of plaque. Plaque is an accumulation of fat and cholesterol. This may lead to a stroke or a heart attack, which happens when the arteries become totally blocked, causing ischemia or death of the tissues.


It’s frightening, yes, but there is hope. You have the ability to protect your heart health. One way to accomplish this is to follow the “Big Four” habits that help prevent heart disease:


  1. Eat a healthy diet.
  2. Get regular exercise.
  3. Maintain a healthy weight.
  4. Avoid smoking.


Risk factors for heart disease are habits or inclinations that make a person more likely to develop the disease as well as the likelihood the condition will worsen. Research shows each risk factor greatly

HEART HEALTH FOR WOMAN

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health & Wellness magazines.

more articles by jean jeffers

increases the chances you will develop heart disease. You may reduce your personal risk by learning what your risk factors are and, in some cases, changing the behavior on which the risk is based, i.e. obesity. With other risks that cannot be changed, such as age, carefully monitoring your response to the risk is beneficial. In the matter of weight, watching your food choices and getting extra exercise could improve your health and literally add years to your life.


Some risk factors are perilous but they may be treated or eliminated. Cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, physical inactivity and diabetes are such risks. You, fortunately, have some control over them by taking care and paying attention.


Other risk factors cannot be changed, such as a family history of the disease. After menopause, women are more susceptible to cardiac problems. The first step is becoming aware of your individual risks. Begin that process with a physical exam by your doctor. Ask for the information you need. You want to know your numbers. Ask for a lipoprotein profile, a blood test that measures good and bad cholesterol. You want a blood pressure reading, a fasting blood sugar level reading and a body mass measurement (BMI).