HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

subscribe to Health & Wellness

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

Lifestyle changes – such as exercising, reducing sodium in your diet, managing stress, not smoking, eating a heart-healthy diet and losing weight – can improve your quality of life. Talk with your primary care physicians about the things you can do to help you cope with heart failure.


Sources:


HEART FAILURE CHANGES THE STRUCTURE OF THE HEART: BE AWARE OF THE SYMPTOMS

There are more than 3 million cases of heart failure in the United States every year. It is more common in women than in men. Risk factors for developing heart failure include sleep apnea, viruses and alcohol and tobacco use. While there is no known cure, various treatments can help you manage the condition, improve symptoms and help you live longer. Medications generally prescribed for heart failure include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, which widen blood vessels to lower blood pressure, improve blood flow and decrease the workload on the heart. Angiotensin II receptor blockers are an alternative to ACE inhibitors for people who cannot tolerate them. Beta blockers slow your heart rate and reduce blood pressure, and diuretics help prevent build up of fluid. You may have to undergo coronary bypass surgery or have a heart valve repair or replacement.


Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are another form of treatment for heart failure. A VAD, also known as a mechanical circulatory support device, is an implantable mechanical pump that helps move blood from the lower chambers of your heart (the ventricles) to the rest of your body. A VAD is implanted into the abdomen or chest and attached to a weakened heart to help it pump blood throughout your body. At worse, you may need to have a heart transplant.

Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (also known as HFrEF) is a condition in which the heart muscle is too stretched and weak to pump out the blood the body needs. Symptoms of heart failure include shortness of breath when performing everyday activities; swelling (edema) in the legs, feet and ankles; trouble sleeping when you lie flat; rapid weight gain; and a dry, hacking cough that doesn’t go away.


All these symptoms occur because the heart can’t pump strongly enough to keep up with the blood supply. This causes fluid to back up and leak into the lungs or collect in the tissues. Certain conditions, such as narrowed arteries in your heart or high blood pressure, gradually leave your heart too weak to fill and pump efficiently. In HFrEF, the walls of the heart chamber are too stiff to relax properly. The heart can’t function as it should; it pumps less blood out to the body. HFrEF is most commonly detected with an echocardiogram (ECG) or an echocardiogram. Sometimes a stress test is used to diagnose heart failure.


Heart failure often develops after other conditions have damaged or weakened your heart. These may include faulty heart valves and heart muscle damage. Congenital heart disease is another factor in heart failure. Chronic diseases such as diabetes or HIV also may contribute to heart failure.