FEMALE INFERTILITY HAS MANY FACTORS

Infertility means being unable to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or six months if the woman is over age 35). Infertility results from female factors about one-third of the time and male factors about one-third of the time. If a woman keeps having miscarriages, this is also called infertility. Female infertility contributes to nearly 50 percent of all infertility cases.

….FULL ARTICLE

UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION IN WOMEN

Depression is a common but serious mood disorder. It reveals itself through symptoms such as hopelessness, pessimism, irritability, guilt, helplessness and decreased energy or fatigue lasting at least two weeks or longer. About twice as many women as men experience depression. Several factors may increase a woman’s risk of depression.

….FULL ARTICLE

RECOVERING FROM A HEART ATTACK

What happens now?  That is a question you could ask after surviving a heart attack.  How do you take care of yourself afterwards so that there is no repeat?  According to Family Doctor (www.familydoctor.org), a heart attack happens when part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies because it does not receive enough oxygen. The blood in the coronary arteries carries oxygen to the heart muscle. Most heart attacks occur when a blockage slows down or stops the flow of blood through these arteries.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Whatever you do, start small, set goals and reward yourself when you reach them.


Sources and Resources

Medline Plus: Weight Loss with heart disease The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.


Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease. Coronary heart disease occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened and narrow due to a build-up of plaque on the arteries’ inner walls. Plaque is the accumulation of fat, cholesterol and other dead cells. As this sticky substance adheres on the walls of the arteries, blood flow to the heart muscle is reduced. If this blood supply is cut off to a portion of the coronary heart muscle, the result is a lack of fresh oxygenated blood to that part of the heart muscle, resulting in a heart attack.


There are some well-known risk factors for heart disease, such as smoking and high cholesterol. According to the handbook, some women have a group of risk factors known as metabolic syndrome, which is usually caused by overweight or obesity and not getting enough physical activity. A healthy weight is necessary for a long active life. In the United States, about 62 percent of American women age 20 years and older are

HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health & Wellness magazines.

more articles by jean jeffers

overweight — and of that number, about 33 percent are obese. The more overweight a woman is, the higher her risk for developing heart disease. Losing weight reduces that risk.


But losing weight effectively and keeping it off requires lifestyle changes, such as changes in eating and physical activity. The institute recommends no more than one-half to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, as well as taking a long-term approach to the subject.


For those considering losing weight, the institute recommends a combination of diet and regular exercise such as walking, swimming or biking. Cutting down on calories, especially from fat, is paramount. These two behaviors are a challenge for many but are not impossible to undertake.


Other tips from The Heart Health Handbook include: