GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.  Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue.

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A DIET FOR HEALTH & WEIGHT LOSS

Have you noticed? Look around and you’ll see a majority of Americans who are either overweight or obese. Look in supermarkets and you’ll see a plethora of food products, many of them processed or high-fat and/or sweet laden.  Consuming such a diet often leads to poor health and weight gain. It is not surprising that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. A number of diseases, including pre-diabetes, diabetes, stroke and depression, are linked to how we eat .....

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ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.

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They contain beneficial vitamins, minerals and nutrients.


• Eat more fish. It’s a good source of protein and contains many minerals and proteins. Try eating two portions of fish a week, including one portion of oily fish, which contains omega-3 fats and helps prevents heart disease.


• Use salt sparingly and stick to low-salt foods to avoid high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease or a stroke. Americans get most of their sodium – 77 percent – from processed foods. Adults should not eat more than 6 grams of salt per day. Read food labels to help you reduce your salt intake. More than 1.5 gram of salt per 100 grams means the food is high in salt.


• Stick to reduced-fat milk and other dairy products. Substitute evaporated skim milk for cream in sauces, soups and coffee. Try low-fat cheese and nonfat yogurt.


• Only eat small amounts of foods that contain added sugars; consuming food and drinks high in sugar increases the risk of obesity and tooth decay. Cut down on alcoholic drinks, sugary fizzy drinks and sugary breakfast cereals. Read food

A balanced healthy diet should contain a variety of nutritious foods and sufficient vitamins and minerals. Such a diet can help you maintain a healthy body weight and reduce your risk of many diet-related problems, such type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It’s recommended men have around 2,500 calories a day and women 2,000 calories a day. Studies indicate eating a typical Western diet filled with packaged meals, takeout foods, processed meats and sugary snacks may lead to stress, high rates of depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety. Here are some healthy eating tips to counteract these possibilities:


• Eat a range of nutritious foods, such as whole-grain bread and cereals, fruits, vegetables and legumes, such as red kidney beans, lentils and chickpeas.


• Use healthy cooking methods, such as baking, broiling, poaching, steaming and roasting, especially when you prepare meat and fish. Use a nonstick pan or nonstick spray coating instead of margarine or butter.


• One-third of your food should be based on starchy carbohydrates, such as rice, bread, pasta, cereals and potatoes. Choose whole-grain varieties when you can; they contain more fiber.


• Eat five portions of a variety of fruits and vegetables daily.

HEALTHY EATING TIPS

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh

labels to check how much sugar certain foods contain. More than 22.5 grams of total sugars per 100 grams means the food is high in sugar.


• Keep fat to a minimum. Men should have no more than 30 grams of saturated fat a day, while women should eat 20 grams of saturated fat. Substitute good fats (mono and polyunsaturated fats) for bad fats (saturated and trans fats). Choose lean meats, fish and poultry without skin instead of fattier cuts of meats, and use olive or canola oil instead of butter.


• Eat foods rich in calcium and iron. Calcium is important for bone health, while iron carries oxygen around the body and reduces the risk of anemia. Recommended calcium levels are 1,000 milligrams per day and 1,200 milligrams for those over age 50 years. Limit foods that deplete your calcium storage, such as alcohol, sugary drinks and caffeine.


• Drink alcohol in moderation. Men should have fewer than two drinks per day and women fewer than one drink per day.


• Don’t forget to drink six to eight glasses of water daily.


• Cook and eat more at home. You will have more control over the ingredients, preparation methods and portions.


• Don’t ban certain foods; it will only make you want them more. Start by reducing portion sizes and not eating them as often. Also, be mindful of how you eat. Stop eating before you feel full. It takes a few minutes for your brain to tell your body it is full, so eat slowly.


• A healthy breakfast can jumpstart your metabolism and eating healthy, small meals during the day keeps your energy up.


• Maintain a balance between exercise and food intake, which helps maintain muscle strength and a healthy body weight. You need to do at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily, such as walking.