Gingivitis May Be Genetic

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and hormonal changes such as those related to pregnancy and menstruation can also lead to gingivitis.


Chronic gingiva inflammation is thought to be associated with some systemic diseases such as respiratory disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research report gingivitis is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke and lung disease.


Several techniques are used to deep clean your teeth without surgery and remove plaque and tarter to prevent gum irritation. Scaling removes tartar from above and below the gum line. Root planing smoothes rough spots and removes plaque and tartar from the root surface. Lasers may remove tartar with less pain and bleeding than scaling and root planing.


Brushing your teeth for two minutes at least twice daily and brushing after every meal or snack or as your dentist recommends can help reduce gingivitis. Flossing before you brush allows you to clean away loosened food particles and bacteria.

GINGIVITIS MAY BE GENETIC

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

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Be sure to see your dentist or dental hygienist regularly for cleanings, usually every six to 12 months. Healthy eating and managing blood sugar if you have diabetes are also important for maintaining gum health.


Sources:


Gingivitis is a common, mild form of gum disease (periodontal disease) that causes irritation, redness and swelling (inflammation) of the gingiva, the part of the gum around the base of the teeth. It can lead to a serious gum disease called periodontitis and tooth loss.


The American Academy of Periodontology says up to 30 percent of Americans may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. The most common cause of gingivitis is poor oral hygiene. Plaque is an extremely sticky, colorless to pale yellow deposit of bacteria that regularly builds up on the teeth if you do not brush regularly. The bacteria produce acids that attack your tooth enamel and can damage the gums. This damage may become permanent if left untreated. Brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily and getting regular dental checkups can help prevent and reverse gingivitis. Non-plaque induced gingival lesions can be caused by a specific bacterium, virus or fungus. It might also be caused by genetic factors, systemic conditions (including allergic reactions and certain illnesses), wounds or reactions to foreign bodies, such as dentures. Sometimes, there is no specific cause of gum disease.


Signs and symptoms of gingivitis include swollen or puffy gums; dusky or dark red gums; gums that bleed easily when you brush or floss; bad breath; and receding and tender gums. Factors that can increase your risk of gingivitis include age, dry mouth, smoking or chewing tobacco and conditions that decrease immunity such as leukemia, HIV/ AIDS or cancer treatment. Poor nutrition, including vitamin C deficiency,