FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: JANUARY 2021

Scientists Develop ‘Ink’ to Produce Food Via 3D Printing


A group of researchers believe they have come a step closer to the mass industrialization of 3D printed food. The team at the University of São Paulo’s Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ-USP) in Brazil, in partnership with colleagues in France at Nantes Atlantic College of Veterinary Medicine, Food Science and Engineering and the National Institute for Research on Agriculture, Food and Environment have developed hydrogels that act as “ink.” “In the past few years we’ve developed different technologies to modify starch and obtain gels with ideal characteristics for use as ‘ink’ to produce food by 3D printing,” said Pedro Esteves Duarte Augusto, a professor at ESALQ-USP and principal investigator for the project. The first gels produced by the researchers were based on cassava starch. By varying aspects of the process, the researchers obtained gels with different properties to find the right consistency for use in 3D printing.


Source: www.newfoodmagazine.com


FDA Updates Food Label


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has updated the nutrition facts label on packaged foods and drinks. This is the first major update to the label in over 20 years.

 The refreshed design and updated information will make it easier for consumers to make informed food choices that contribute to lifelong healthy eating habits, the FDA says. The serving size and calories now appear in larger, bold font. Some serving sizes (which are not recommendations for how much to eat) have been updated. Added sugars, vitamin D and potassium are now listed. Use the label to support your personal dietary needs. Choose foods that contain more of the nutrients you want to get more of and less of the nutrients you may want to limit. The FDA says choosing healthier foods and beverages can help reduce the risk of developing some health conditions, such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and anemia.


Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (www.fda.gov)


Is Pretty Food Healthier For You?


Consumers appear to be under the impression that pretty food is healthier than other food. It’s a mistake the food industry, advertisers and restaurants count on to promote products. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC)

recently published a study in the Journal of Marketing that employed social science and psychology to unravel the complexity of how perceptions of beauty drive our appetite and spending decisions. “Marketers frequently style food to look pretty,” said Linda Hagen, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of marketing at the USC Marshall School of Business. “People associate aesthetic beauty with nature and natural things, which transfers to perceptions that pretty food is healthy food, but people are often misled by the prettiness of food that’s not very good for you.” Consumers see almost 7,000 food and restaurant ads annually – about 19 per day. Advertisers employ teams of food stylists and digital tools to render food irresistible. Hagen examined how classical aesthetics used in food presentation skews perception. Moreover, previous neuroscience research suggests viewing delectable food images activates the brain’s gustatory cortex, essentially simulating the food’s pleasurable taste. In a series of experiments involving 4,300 subjects, the researcher asked people to examine photos of food as well as actual samples of food, then evaluate the displays as healthy or unhealthy and processed or unprocessed. Overwhelmingly, both men and women reported pretty food was healthier.



Source: University of Southern California (www.usc.edu)

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.